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Teaching and Leading in Times of Crisis

Unfortunately, there are times when a crisis may arise in a school or community. Whether it be a loss, catastrophic weather event, or illness, teachers and administrators are responsible for taking care of their students and staff. This collection provides some resources on how to take care of students, school community members, and oneself.
A Collection By Elizabeth Kaplan
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Teaching and Leading in Times of Crisis
  • Elizabeth Kaplan says:
    Hospice Care, Inc put together this resource that gives educators solid advice on how to help a student should they experience illness or loss in their family. A most helpful part of the book is that it breaks down how children experience grief based on their developmental level. It also outlines staff members role in helping a student (school nurse, teacher, even PTO).
  • Elizabeth Kaplan says:
    The Children's Room is a website devoted to helping children, teens, or families with grief. It states "no child, teen, or family should have to grieve alone" and outlines ways an educator can support.
  • -Expecting-the-Unexpected.aspx
    -Expecting-the-Unexpected.aspx

    Educational Leadership:Strategies for Success:School Crisis Response: Expecting the Unexpected

    8 minute read
    Elizabeth Kaplan says:
    Although this article is from 1994, it provides examples of specific (and very sad) crisis that could occur in a school community. The article then provides a school crisis intervention model that could be implemented and applied to any kind of crisis or tragedy. It offers protocol and procedure to follow, which are extremely important in a time where there may be chaos and emotion.
  • Secondary Traumatic Stress

    Website
    traumaawareschools.org
    traumaawareschools.org
    Elizabeth Kaplan says:
    If an educator, administrator, or care giver is dealing with others' trauma, they can experience what is called "secondary trauma". This is a one page read with helpful links. Secondary stress and trauma can be a very real thing and colleagues and administrators can support each other and identify the symptoms.
  • Elizabeth Kaplan says:
    This manual of FAQs covers questions that an adult may have following violence, disasters, terrorism, or other traumatic event. ELL students who come to schools from abroad may have experienced trauma or terrorism that is not known to the teacher. This document is helpful for understanding how a student may be affected following any number of events.
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BloomBoard Asks:Have you had to teach through a time of crisis? What did you learn from it?