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Cross-Curricular

Smoother Transitions Through Call and Response and Song

Whether it's going from one activity to the next, or getting your class' attention, transitions can be difficult for younger students. Singing and the "call and response" techniques can be the key to helping make these transitions smoother. Check out these resources that provide the research behind why these techniques are helpful and examples on how to use them in your classroom.
A Collection By Emilie Campbell
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Smoother Transitions Through Call and Response and Song
  • Singing Smoothes Transitions

    Website
    southernearlychildhood.org
    southernearlychildhood.org
    Emilie Campbell says:
    Are your classroom transitions taking longer than you would like them to? If so, check out this article about how music can smooth out your daily transitions and why it will help your students.
  • Emilie Campbell says:
    There is actual science behind why call and response is so effective in the classroom. Be sure to read this article to find the research to support this effect management tool.
  • Emilie Campbell says:
    Here are call and response examples at your fingertips! Have fun trying out the different styles of calls and responses with your class to see which ones work the best and catch their attention fastest.
  • Whole Brain Teaching

    Website
    wholebrainteaching.com
    wholebrainteaching.com
    Emilie Campbell says:
    Whole brain teaching is an approach to teaching which maximizes student learning and focuses on the way the brain learns. This style of teaching incorporates a lot of call and response with movement. This site is full of valuable resource to help make classroom management a breeze for you!
  • Emilie Campbell says:
    See elementary teachers talk about and implement attention signals that work for them, such as call and response, songs, counting up, and counting down. This video also addresses some questions like, “What do I do when the signal doesn’t work?” and “Should I use the same signal all the time or mix it up?” Take a look at the comments section for more ideas from teachers. I love the practicality of this resource, and I am inspired by the glimpses of teachers in action!