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How to Talk to Parents about Common Core Math

Many parents are intimidated or confused by common core math because it is not the same math they learned in school. This discomfort can quickly turn to frustration and anger towards the teacher if appropriate measures are not taken to educate and familiarize parents with the philosophy and practice of common core math. This collection includes strategies for talking to parents, evidence that common core math works, and tools for making common core math more accessible to parents.
A Collection By Jason Gordon
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
How to Talk to Parents about Common Core Math
  • scholastic.com
    scholastic.com

    Math Literature: Creating a Math Library at Home

    5 minute read
    Jason Gordon says:
    Sometimes the simplest solutions are the best. If I had a quarter for every time my kids replied, “Nothing,” when I asked them what they were doing in school, I would have enough money to buy half the books on list. Now I simply ask them about an event in a book we are all reading, and they often instinctively connect it to what they are doing in math class at school.
  • Jason Gordon says:
    Many websites look good on the surface, but end up either having limited content or are hard to search. This website looks good AND has great content! I asked my 11 year old son what he was doing in math, and I was able to find a video that explained how students learn ratios in mere seconds.
  • Jason Gordon says:
    One thing that is great about this video is how it uses footage from some well known sources claiming that common core math is unnecessarily complicated. We can laugh at Colbert trying to pay his dinner bill, and we can relate to the 'Frustrated Parent" letter to the teacher. But jokes aside, once we begin to understand the point of common core math, the benefit of the methods become clear.
  • Jason Gordon says:
    This book is worth the price simply for the extensive references section at the end of it. So much fascinating research has been done about how the brain works and how that affects one’s capacity to learn math. Plus, in addition to this being such a useful resource (it also has an appendix with printouts and activities), it is also a very interesting and engaging read.
  • americanprogress.org
    americanprogress.org

    Math Matters

    10 minute read
    Jason Gordon says:
    I read this article earlier this year and have since used it as my 'go to' article for explaining the theory behind common core math. Recently, I downloaded the pdf, and I was pleasantly surprised at the wealth of knowledge in this report. It includes history, theory, explanations and diagrams that make it an extremely useful resource.
  • Jason Gordon says:
    Most books I have read about talking with parents focus on the principles of collaboration and emphasize the importance of parent-teacher communication. This book delivers actual communication strategies to be used in multiple contexts. Chapter 3 was particularly helpful to me as it covers keeping lines of communication open throughout the school year without it being a burden on the teacher.
  • Jason Gordon says:
    I showed this blog to a group of faculty during a tech share, and I still have colleagues bring it up from time to time in casual conversation. “Hey did you see the ‘Nightly Math’ post about the ‘Math-y Mustaches’?” Some teachers even use the scenarios to come up with their own questions. I recently used the ‘Fat Dog’ scenario as the basis for an economics question about negative consumption externalities.