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Drama Free Testing: No fear, better scores?

Like it or not, standardized testing is a big part of the student experience. How can we prepare students for testing academically and emotionally without stigmas or anxiety? As educators, we know frequent and consistent assessment is key, but that does not mean we have to teach to the test. Our challenge is to find strategies for creating confident test takers without compromising our curriculum!
A Collection By Jen Jeffers
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Drama Free Testing: No fear, better scores?
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    This book discusses the possible downside to standardized testing and the impact it has on curriculum.
  • washingtonpost.com
    washingtonpost.com

    Unanswered questions about standardized tests

    5 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Questions, it goes without saying, are important. All human-made disasters have at least one thing in common—those responsible acted without first asking good questions. Are we asking the right questions about something as important as standardized testing? Here you will find some of the questions educators ask that have yet to be answered. Decide for yourself if ignoring them doesn’t guarantee educational and cultural disaster.
  • pbs.org
    pbs.org

    Testing - Testing, Assessment, And Excellence

    8 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Providing a solid history of how testing began, this piece also discusses students as commodities who are meant to be measured. Even though educators often have best intentions at heart, are they also part of the larger problem?
  • edexcellence.net
    edexcellence.net

    Bless the tests: Three reasons for standardized testing

    6 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Yes, some people say there are good reasons to test! Whether you agree or not, this article lays out the supports clearly and rationally, paying attention to the goals of the process more than if they are achieved.
  • csmonitor.com
    csmonitor.com

    Debate Over Standardized Testing is Focusing on the Wrong Questions

    5 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Perhaps there is room for some kind of standardized testing in our educational world. Rather than discard the entire process, we should ask better questions about how the test can be improved. Granted, this article is a few years old and the SAT has apparently been updated, but is there more that we can do? Time will tell if the steps already taken have been enough.
  • washingtonpost.com
    washingtonpost.com

    11 key questions on standardized testing for Congress to answer

    6 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    It is one thing to bat the idea of standardized testing around with fellow educators, complaining or supporting as we see fit. It's quite another to consider the amount of harm this process could be doing to our larger educational system and subsequently, upcoming generations. Here you will find some deep questions regarding these consequences and the price we will pay for not getting it right.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    Now here is an article you can really sink your teeth into…especially if you have always suspected that standardized tests are problematic. This extensive essay on the cons of such testing is thoughtful and articulate. Revealing the plain truths of profit and educational agendas is painful but, for the sake of our students and children, necessary.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    There are plenty of people who say standardized testing is here to stay and can, in fact, create concrete learning in students. This light article is a proponent of this research and rather than argue the existence of such tests, it illustrates some pretty useful strategies in keeping kids on top of the assessment game. If you can beat 'em, join 'em?
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:How would the experience of a college-bound student be different without standardized testing?