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The Buzz: Teaching Sex Ed with Humor and Grace

While it can often be a challenging subject for the classroom setting, we all know sex education is an important part of the middle school curriculum. Rather than fear the process, perhaps we can establish some strategies and ideas around how to handle it with aplomb. After all, it is an essential part of life and a fun opportunity to help your students gain a clear understanding of how to be smart and safe.
A Collection By Jen Jeffers
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
The Buzz: Teaching Sex Ed with Humor and Grace
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    When in doubt, find a TED talk! The bottom line is talking about sex in front of angst-ridden teens is never going to be easy if you have not first established a personal level of comfort with the subject. Here's a quick 101 on how to lose the embarrassment and focus on the importance of being informed.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    This a wonderful piece on what makes sex ed different for boys vs. girls and how we can be most sensitive to the issue of gender during this learning. It also provides some really candid and helpful questions around the topic to ignite discussion and promote honesty.
  • jstor.org
    jstor.org

    The Role of the School in Family-Life Education

    6 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    You will find some interesting history in this book around the role of education in family life and particularly how, from the beginning, teachers have been enlisted to assist in the "problems of parenthood." Understanding why schools are expected to teach this curriculum and how it has developed over the years is an eye opener.
  • advocatesforyouth.org
    advocatesforyouth.org

    Effective Sex Education

    7 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Old fashioned or not, some people say class discussions about sex are unnecessary, as abstinence is the best option. Here are some concrete references as to why we must support sex ed at school and keep such programs effective and realistic.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    One more serious educational approach to sex ed can be found here. For some of us, grasping the curriculum is the best place to start. And consequently, there are indeed standards associated with this educational piece. Having these under your belt before stepping in front of students can't be a bad idea.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    Okay, enough discussion already--let's get down to brass tacks…how do we TEACH it? This is a lengthy and specific guide for precisely this purpose. You certainly wouldn't throw yourself out of an airplane without a parachute and that's precisely why you should read this primer for new teachers and seasoned vets.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    If you are curious how sex education looks from state to state, this is a brilliant piece for you. If you think the Common Core is controversial, take a look at the discrepancies between states on this provocative issue. Clarifying the guidelines of your state is certainly a start, but assessing the best way to maneuver around the system as a teacher is imperative to success.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    This article from the sexperts at Planned Parenthood will help you visualize the challenge of family education in its entirety.
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