Middle School1 more
Cross-Curricular

Digital Law is for Everyone

One of the 9 Elements of Digital Citizenship is Digital Law, which is an often overlooked yet a vital part of a student becoming a responsible Digital Citizen. Digital law is the “legal rights and restrictions governing technology use.” How well do your students understand file sharing, copyright, and citations for academic work? In this collection, I touch on some important resources you can add to your curriculum.
A Collection By John Cork
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Digital Law is for Everyone
  • John Cork says:
    Teachingcopyright.org provides an impressive free curriculum that covers "Copyright Law" and "The Application of Free Use". You find the curriculum divided into unit goals, objectives, lesson plans and supporting resources. The lesson plan section contains five, 60-minute engaging lessons covering topics like "Fair Use" and "P2P File Sharing". The resource section is helpful, featuring quizzes, worksheets, and FAQs. Get started today with this big time saver!
  • John Cork says:
    Students often download, save, and use copyrighted images, audio files and video clips without giving proper credit to the owner/producer. Did you know there is a website where students and teachers can find content that is legal to share, use and remix? Creative Commons has a database of media that allows students to “use & remix” without violating copyright law. Just type a search term into their search engine to get started.
  • John Cork says:
    Do your student have the knowledge to properly cite articles, media, and research they often use in their academic work? Citation Machine helps student properly credit the information they use in their own academic work. The website generates formats like APA, MLA, Chicago and many more. Students have the ability to create their own citations or may find the resource in the Citation Machine’s database. From here they can edit, copy and paste the citation into their own student work.
  • John Cork says:
    Looking for an interesting way to engage students in what might be considered a dull topic? This student-centered website comes to us from the Library of Congress and features 4 engaging animations that explore copyright law. Here you’ll find colorful characters that explore U.S. Copyright Law, copyright history, and registering a copyright. Teachers can also find out how this resource aligns with Common Core, state content, and organizational standards.
  • educationworld.com
    educationworld.com

    The Educator's Guide to Copyright and Fair Use

    4 minute read
    John Cork says:
    As an educator do you fully understand the implications of copyright and fair use? Education World provides a five-part series titled, “The Educator's Guide to Copyright and Fair Use”. Dive into the following topics: "Copyrights and Copying Wrongs", "Is Fair Use a License to Steal?", "Copyright Law and New Technologies", "Apply Fair Use to New technologies" and "District Liability and Teaching Responsibility."
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:How do you teach Digital Law in your own teaching practice?