Middle School1 more
Computing

Gamify your Coding Curriculum

In recent years the importance of teaching coding to students has gained serious momentum. With this momentum, we have seen a proliferation of web-based educational coding websites that use gamification to engage students. The good news …you don’t have to be a technology genius to bring coding to your classroom! Here I list online coding platforms that are easy to use and incorporate gamification.
A Collection By John Cork
  • 4 Collection Items
  • 4 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Gamify your Coding Curriculum
  • The author says:
    Achieve your dreams and change the world Learn from over 1000 videos created by expert teachers on web design, coding, business, and much more. Our library is continually refreshed with the latest on web technology so you'll never fall behind. Practice what you've learned through quizzes and interactive Code Challenges.
  • John Cork says:
    Codecombat.com is perhaps the most engaging web-based coding platform I’ve utilized in my teaching practice. Students must try and code their way through this role-playing game by mastering programming challenges. The website also provides the teacher with curriculum and implementation guides to make using Codecombat a pleasure. The website offers its “Introduction to Computer Science” module for free. Complete access to the additional units starts at around $30 per student/per year.
  • Learn to code

    Webtool
    codecademy.com
    codecademy.com
    John Cork says:
    What do you do for your students who’d like to move into more intermediate to advanced programming concepts? I found Codecademy to be the perfect online learning platform. It offers interactive tutorials for a host of popular programming languages like JavaScript, Python, Ruby as well as web development skills including CSS and HTML. I love how Codeacademy.com motivates my students to participate with immediate feedback, badges for completing exercises and a scoring system.
  • John Cork says:
    Code.org is one of my favorite resources and a great jumping-in point for any teacher interested in bringing coding and gamification to their classroom. Code.org, started in 2013, helped to ignite the coding revolution in American schools. The website provides a host of beginner coding challenges featuring popular culture including Anna and Elsa, Star Wars and Angry Birds.