High School
History & Social Studies1 more

Build a Better Argument

The main resource here is a lesson plan helping students study the structure of arguments. Through three classroom activities led by the teacher, students identify premises and conclusions and evaluate arguments' effectiveness. This lesson is useful as an introduction to philosophy, for helping students prepare for persuasive writing, and for helping students develop critical thinking skills. Links to extend the lesson are included.
A Collection By Jorie Henrickson
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Build a Better Argument
  • Jorie Henrickson says:
    This handy poster makes a great reference when teachers are prompting critical thinking or creating assessments. It includes a wide selection of question stems and fill-in-the-blank examples using different levels of Bloom's taxonomy to promote and assess students' understanding and critical thinking. The poster is laminated for durable classroom use too and can guide students as they work to write compelling persuasive essays.
  • criticalthinking.net
    criticalthinking.net

    Twenty-One Strategies and Tactics for Teaching Critical Thinking

    Article
    Jorie Henrickson says:
    This reference is from Robert Ennis, an educator and critical thinking researcher at the University of Illinois. The list begins with three basics of teaching critical thinking: helping students be reflective, offer thoughtful reasons for their judgments, and look for alternative explanations. It continues with fundamental strategies and tactics that teachers can use to promote critical thinking across the curriculum.
  • Jorie Henrickson says:
    This six-minute PBS video can supplement the Aristotelian Argument lesson plan. Here a young commentator refers to the low quality of arguments seen online. He shares five flaws that are common among low-quality arguments.
  • Jorie Henrickson says:
    This lesson plan introduces Aristotelian logic. This link is added to help teachers brush up on Aristotelian logic or to get additional information for students. Included are explorations of Aristotle's three ways to persuade and his list of 13 logical fallacies.
  • Syllogism

    Website
    simple.wikipedia.org
    simple.wikipedia.org
    Jorie Henrickson says:
    To start this lesson the teacher can present a humorous twist on Aristotelian logic: amusing syllogisms. Search online for "funny syllogisms" to find lots of relevant memes and websites. Students can be challenged to write their own true and false syllogisms during class or for homework.
  • teachhub.com
    teachhub.com

    Teaching Strategies to Promote Critical Thinking

    3 minute read
    Jorie Henrickson says:
    Concise and useful, this article from education writer Janelle Fox addresses the "why" and "how" of teaching critical thinking skills in the classroom.
  • Jorie Henrickson says:
    One exercise in the above lesson refers to Monty Python's six-minute "Argument Clinic" sketch. Here a man pays to have a top-notch argument and is disappointed by his opponent's lack of skill.
  • Jorie Henrickson says:
    This lesson plan for high school and college students instills tips for identifying arguments' premises and conclusions, and analyzing their effectiveness. Objectives are 1) distinguishing premises from conclusions and 2) separating arguments from explanations. The plan was created by Dr. Joe Miller, a Philosopher educated at the University of Virginia and a staff writer at FactCheck.org.