Middle School
History & Social Studies1 more

Solar Cooking around the World & on the Moon

Solar energy can power anything, including connections across the curriculum. These resources for science and social studies can help students actively learn how solar energy works and how it’s used in food preparation in specific societies. The first activity has groups design solar ovens from the same simple materials, make S’mores and critically compare their work. The second activity has groups create solar ovens for use in specific regions of the world and prepare related cuisine.
A Collection By Jorie Henrickson
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Solar Cooking around the World & on the Moon
  • Planet Smarty Pants says:
    We are only a few days away from the longest day of the year when we celebrate the life-giving power of the Sun. So today I want to move beyond melted crayons and share 10 fantastic experiments to help kids "play with the sun" and learn more about solar energy.
  • Jorie Henrickson says:
    In textbook style this well-written government webpage presents a wealth of information about solar energy. This page is recommended to teachers planning a unit about solar energy.
  • Jorie Henrickson says:
    An optional lesson extension is challenging teams of students to build unique solar ovens. This one-minute video shows how junior high school students in California built ovens for specific world regions and cooked regional cuisine.
  • scholastic.com
    scholastic.com

    Solar Cooking Background Information

    3 minute read
    Jorie Henrickson says:
    This handout from Scholastic contextualizes the solar oven activity by explaining how solar ovens are used around the world. This page also relates solar cooking to environmental friendliness. Teachers can use this page to develop a 10-minute mini lesson to present on the day before the solar oven challenge.
  • Jorie Henrickson says:
    This NASA lesson plan challenges students to build simple solar powered ovens. The lesson starts with a three-minute video about living on the Moon and ends with students eating s'mores. Meeting the solar oven challenge requires making accurate measurements, devising a strategy for scientific inquiry, and completing other activities that meet states' education standards for math, science and critical thinking.