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Math

Developing Number Sense

Knowing how numbers relate to each other matters for later math success. The resources in this collection explain what number sense is and how to teach it. This skill is usually taught during the early elementary grades, although some students will require additional practice beyond those years.
A Collection By Karen Cornell
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Developing Number Sense
  • learnnc.org
    learnnc.org

    Number sense every day

    5 minute read
    Karen Cornell says:
    This short article explains what number sense is and why it is important. Much like foundational reading skills, number skills need to be broken down and taught to students. I like this article because it explains number skills and also ways to develop the skills with students. I think it is important to understand the different ways this skill can be developed. One of the ways I would have overlooked at first is the method of playing math games with students, but is really so important.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    Her books offer fantastic overviews of the skills involved in addition and subtraction. The overview teaches you how to put yourself in the place of a child and break down number skills. Then the book shows how to teach increasingly complicated skills. I've used almost all of this book with students of the years. My two favorite games that she uses are the Build a City (teaching number combinations to 10) and Creation Cards students use to create their own word problems using manipulatives.
  • teachingchannel.org
    teachingchannel.org

    Number Talks and Safe Classroom Culture

    5 minute read
    Karen Cornell says:
    Number talks are a big part of a classroom number sense routine. Thinking and talking about numbers can be a big risk for students and it can be tough to know how to support them and their feelings. This blog post follows a teacher's reflections on navigating a conversation with a student who has number sense misconceptions and how to work with that. I always think it is important to keep in mind what an impact maintaining an open and safe space for mathematical thinking can have for students.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    Number skills are critical and an indicator of school success. Progress Monitoring and interventions are often needed to make sure all students are mastering instruction. There is a lot to remember! This resource breaks down the progression of skills into rubrics with interventions, plus on the Developmental Math Assessment page there are tutorial videos for delivering the assessment. Having a resource to track systematic instruction is so helpful with determining what students need to learn.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    Touch Math is a well respected and research based math curriculum that uses the number as a manipulative. Buying the materials can be expensive so I recommend checking with your school/district about support for purchasing. I have seen a lot of success from using the materials and often watch students independently use the techniques to solve problems. I linked to the website because it has the most up-to-date information and materials, although a web search turns up lots of examples.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    If the Kathy Richardson books describe the reasoning behind number sense and provide a wide variety of ways to practice, this series provides systematic instruction starting with the concrete level and progressing through representational and then abstract. I like this series because it includes all of the resources needed and is very clear in its step by step method.I also really like the inclusion of a feedback component. The books are very focused and work with any age level.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    A video about how a teacher facilitates skip counting with counting collections to teach number sense. It is so helpful to watch other teachers teach and listen to the language and timing they use to get the results they want from their students. Counting collections are such a great tool and it is neat to see them in action. I also like the way this video shows the teacher extending the lesson to incorporate place value instruction and take the students further in their thinking.