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Cross-Curricular

Start with the Right Mindset

This collection focuses on supporting the mindsets and challenges specifically faced by teachers in Title 1 Schools.
A Collection By Karen Cornell
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Start with the Right Mindset
  • ascd.org
    ascd.org

    A Framework for Culturally Responsive Teaching

    10 minute read
    Karen Cornell says:
    Culturally responsive teaching, with a mindset of respect for all students, is the best way I know to engage all students. I like the way this article lays out a clear way to begin implementing teaching with this mindset. I particularly like the 4 motivational conditions because they develop the ever elusive intrinsic motivation.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    This video starts with a classroom walk highlighting how the room is organized. It then presents a short lesson example where the teacher demonstrates culturally responsive techniques. I think watching lesson examples is an important part of incorporating them into your repertoire. I would even recommend pausing the video and practicing using the same language as the teacher, especially if these techniques seem new or uncomfortable. Then try pairing some techniques with a well planned lesson.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    This video demonstrates how to encourage and explicitly teach problem solving practices. While this video showcases an elementary classroom, her tips will work for any level. Respectfully teaching students to persist through challenges is essential to engage students in their own learning. I've implemented these strategies and would advise directly teaching the vocabulary needed for this dialogue.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    While this book features a teacher who is burnt out after many years of teaching, there are many lessons in this book for a beginning teacher. Since this book was published almost 20 years ago, some element no longer apply to today's teacher. However, the heart of teaching and how an individual chooses to approach a situation has not changed. I read this book quickly in my first few years of teaching and it inspired me to reflect on how I approach my classes, students and curriculum.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    This website is so inspirational and what I need to reinforce my belief about what I teach and also that there are others out there who feel the same. The free part of the website includes Be Inspired (mission focused), Reduce Stress (proactive strategies) and Quick Tips (short videos). I really appreciate the focus on issues specific to teaching in Title One schools such as handling testing pressure, responding to challenging students and maintaining positive thoughts.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    I have watched this video and every time it re-energizes and reminds me about what is important in teaching. I love her resolve and belief in the power of her students. She has the best quote, "Kids don't learn from people they don’t like." Mindset towards teaching and towards students matters. To me, it is perhaps the most important part. This video transmits the mindset of high achievement and can-do for all students.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    This book explains 6 elements that form the foundation of Teach For America's Teaching as Leadership principles for effective teaching. This book provides insights from teachers in low income schools and also communicates mindsets essential for each of these components. In my opinion, Chapter 1 on Setting Goals and Chapter 3 on Planning Purposefully have valuable insights on areas that sound obvious, but that can be difficult to implement.
  • Karen Cornell says:
    Focusing on urban education this resource puts theory into practice with sample lessons at elementary, middle and high school level that match each strategy discussed. Starting with high expectations, each section is discussed with the teacher in the role of "mediator" who interprets the information and skills needed and then employs strategies to encourage learning. My favorite part is the deep coverage of concepts such as self-control, feeling competent, goal setting and transcendence.