Lower Elementary3 more
Cross-Curricular

Differentiating with Data

Differentiating is probably the single most difficult, important task a teacher will take on. Thankfully, student data helps to ease and guide this process, and gathering and using student data is easier than ever. As a subject area teacher, I have seen huge gains in student achievement since I overcame my differentiation anxiety and started using data-driven differentiation. So, do you feel like pulling your hair out when you attempt to differentiate instruction? Check out these resources.
A Collection By Katherine Waldon
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Differentiating with Data
  • ioeducation.com
    ioeducation.com

    How to: Using data to differentiate instruction

    Article
    Katherine Waldon says:
    Here we have a discussion of data-driven differentiation and some suggestions for how to start. If you are new to differentiation, pay special attention to the section on what differentiation is NOT and the section listing best practices. One of the most useful recommendations is to help students learn to work independently, which is crucial in the differentiated classroom.
  • Katherine Waldon says:
    Teachers often need immediate results from their in-class activities in order to differentiate well. Plickers is a free tool that teachers who don't have a clicker system can use to see real-time results from their students. I cannot stress enough how invaluable this has been for me in my classes. Students simply hold up a card with a symbol representing their answer, and my phone scans each and every answer and uploads the data. It is amazing!
  • Katherine Waldon says:
    In order to use data, you must first collect and store it. This webpage gives you several ideas for how to collect data for your students. There are also various links to some great resources and tutorials.
  • Katherine Waldon says:
    The teachers in this video gather copious amounts of data on their students by assessing them often and in various ways. The students are then grouped based on that data. Notice that the groups are all working on different skills or using different methods, and that the groups are fluid. Assessing often helps the teachers know when an individual student needs to be moved to a different group.
  • Data Walls

    7:53 Minute Video
    teachingchannel.org
    teachingchannel.org
    Katherine Waldon says:
    Using data walls is a great way to make the data you are using visible, and therefore usable. If you want to keep track of individual students, this is a very good way to do it. Notice how the dialogue among teachers, students, coaches, and the principal is crucial to this process.
  • nwea.org
    nwea.org

    Classroom Strategies: Using Data to Differentiate

    Article
    Katherine Waldon says:
    A large portion of differentiating revolves around forming and reforming groups of students based on their needs. What better way to do so than by observing data? This article will walk you through the steps of creating flexible groups with the use of data.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    3 Ways Student Data Can Inform Your Teaching

    Article
    Katherine Waldon says:
    If you are unsure what type of data you should be using in your classroom, check out this article. It explains 3 ways to gather data to use in your classroom. Don't discount using the cumulative files! You can really get a lot of information from past grades and tests.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:How have you applied ideas from this collection to your classroom?
John KellyMiddle School High School Science The Arts Math History & Social Studies Cross-CurricularJuly 20, 2016
With the release of ACT Aspire assessment data the professional learning teams have goals of fostering an inquiry-based culture into our school and revising our instructional approaches to meet student needs. This collection aides in guiding the development of the change in practice.