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Cross-Curricular

Poverty

No matter how you look at, poverty impacts students' learning at school. This is no surprise as poverty inflicts emotional, social, cognitive, and health risks and challenges to these students daily. As professionals in education, it is our job to improve the academic achievement and life skills of financially disadvantaged students. Review this collection to see how this can be accomplished by cultivating healthy environments, supportive schools, and intentional instruction.
A Collection By Kelly Flynn
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Poverty
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    Written by seasoned educator and brain enthusiast, Eric Jensen, Teaching with Poverty in Mind examines poverty and it's impact on children, families, and communities all over the U.S. The book shows how schools can amplify academic performance and life-ready skill sets of economically disadvantaged students. Jensen defends the brain's capacity to expand with experience, so students from poverty can achieve emotional, social, and academic success with intentional instruction aimed at these goals.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    Read this book to learn how schools filled with poorer families can be successful and high performing. Learn strategies schools can utilize to help these students flourish, and how you can employ similar practices in your classroom. Authors William Parrett and Kathleen Budge have analyzed the research, examined the methods in these schools, and reveal vital components that set these organizations apart from other less successful schools.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    Based on thorough exploration of the facts on poverty, these resources were developed to assist teachers and community leaders to prompt purposeful conversation about poverty in America. The materials were created to help understand the vastness of the problem and find ways to increase awareness about poverty in communities. The resources are separated into three units: Grades K-5, 6-12, and Adults, and each unit is divided into four parts: Focus, Activity, Getting Involved, and Learning More.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    This packet, provided by Dr. Donna M. Beegle in her training on poverty, builds a framework for educating students who come from poverty. Since stereotypes are deeply rooted, it's a challenge to evaluate our beliefs and open up to new viewpoints. However difficult, this step is necessary to reach this population and end the stressful cycle they have been raised in. Learn how your beliefs influence your facial expressions, your voice level, your gestures, and your actions toward students.
  • Poverty

    Website
    teachunicef.org
    teachunicef.org
    Kelly Flynn says:
    Enjoy this collection of resources focused on poverty. The lessons attend to Shasha, a teenager from Haiti, who offers the story of her fight to continue her education under extreme circumstances. There are additional materials that include lessons, videos, multimedia content, and stories that explain the challenging patterns of overcoming poverty.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    Use this link to find three different lesson plans that rely on interpreting and writing poetry to promote understanding of homelessness. Each lesson plan is designed for a different age level: Grades 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. Lessons are outlined by objectives, essential questions, materials, steps in instruction, extension ideas, and standards. These activities would be eye-opening for any classroom instruction.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    This unit involves a series of several lessons geared for grades 6-12. The instruction is based on the book, The Working Poor: Invisible in America. Using this book, students examine and ultimately expand their beliefs about poverty. Students study a group classified as the “working poor” using different perspectives and showcase their results to their peers. Afterward, students assimilate what they have learned by answering a series of questions examining poverty and hardworking people.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    Watch this TED Talk by Kandice Sumner who asks, "Why should a good education be exclusive to rich kids?" Sumner reminds us that schools in poor neighborhoods, specifically areas with minorities, need the same resources found in schools populated by a richer population. She refers to musical instruments, quality books, healthy meals and athletic equipment. She shares how this lack of resources weakens students' potential. She prompts us to face this reality and be a part of the change needed.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:How does poverty impact my students and what can I do about it?