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Promoting Effective Talk in your Classroom

Speaking, like reading, is a huge indicator of future success. With today's dependence on technology, students don't always get the exposure to conversation needed to develop communication skills and prepare for work in the world. In order to be effective contributors in society, we need ongoing opportunity for students to have meaningful conversations with their peers and adults. View this collection to find resources for stimulating more conversation in your classroom.
A Collection By Kelly Flynn
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
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Promoting Effective Talk in your Classroom
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Oracy in the Classroom: Strategies for Effective Talk

    Article
    Kelly Flynn says:
    Use this article from School 21 in London to embed oracy into your classroom. Oracy is the ability to speak well. This guide will show you how to create discussion guidelines with your students, guide your students to reach shared agreements, encourage your shy students to speak, and implement discussion roles and structured talk tasks. Plus there's a great video to watch that illustrates some of this strategy.
  • Developing oracy skills

    Website
    classteaching.wordpress.com
    classteaching.wordpress.com
    Kelly Flynn says:
    This article explains why oracy is important and gives ideas for games and activities you can do with your class to improve their talking skills. Some of the ideas include debates, the game 'Taboo', an activity called 'Just a Minute' and another one called 'Secret Post-it Note'. The article also offers easy-to-implement techniques you can use during instruction to improve students' speech.
  • NQTs at The Littlehampton Community School

    Website
    classteaching.files.wordpress.com
    classteaching.files.wordpress.com
    Kelly Flynn says:
    This packet is filled with oracy-based teaching ideas. Improving students speaking doesn't have to be another thing you have to do. You can quickly adapt the suggestions to instruction you already planned. When talking about ‘developing dialogue’, it refers to getting students to talk about their learning and develop their speaking and listening skills. These practices can include asking and answering questions, discussing ideas, and talking about what they know.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    Using the oracy framework which aims to build physical, cognitive, linguistic, and emotional speaking skills, students at School 21 learn to speak on any topic and to any audience. Through this short YouTube video, you can see this framework in action. You will be impressed as I was with the speaking skill sets these young people own.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    Oral language development can be a child's most natural and extensive accomplishment. This article, provided by Reading Rockets, offers a summary of language development as well as detail about the mechanics involved. You will find ways to use this knowledge to amplify the discussion and conversation happening in your classroom. As the article tells us, engaged learners are rarely silent.
  • Kelly Flynn says:
    This link connects you to a thorough presentation on oral language development. It offers extensive information on different language theorists and their philosophy on how children develop language skills. There are also activities described that teachers can include in their instruction to increase oral language development. Within the presentation, there are several links to additional resources and materials that would be helpful on the topic.
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BloomBoard Asks:How can I stimulate productive conversation in my classroom?