High School
Economics

Money Moves: Using Board Games to Teach Economics

Looking to spice up the way that you teach your students about economics? Try using board games! Students tend to retain information better when they're actively involved in a task. With the unique suggestions in this collection, your students will not only be actively involved in economics, but they'll be engaged and interested in learning about the subject further.
A Collection By Kendra Hadnott
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Money Moves: Using Board Games to Teach Economics
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    I was a fan of the fact that Monopoly and Game of Life weren't the only games that were included (although, make no mistake about it, these games were included). Some of these games are guaranteed to be ones that you haven't heard of, which is nice since it allows you and your students to figure things out together.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    This lesson is ideal for educators who prefer to let their students take a more active role in the learning process rather than going through the motions. In this unique lesson plan, students design a board game that teaches about economics. In order to really carry out this lesson, your students will have to have some type of understanding about economics. I've always found tasks like these a great way to assess whether or not they've learned the material.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    This resource simplifies terms and educational games that teach students in grades 6-12 about economics. To combine the board game theme with the methods in this book, have students write their own simple instruction manuals to a board game. Then have them actually design the game.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    It shouldn't come as a surprise that a Harvard professor and International Chess Grandmaster has made more than a few brilliant connections between the game of chess and economics. I love how he uses the game of chess, as it's played by young or old. It makes your economics lessons super teachable!
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    A Ted Talk video from one of the creators of the math-inspired board game, Prime Climb. This is an excellent resource for educators who are looking for a way to make math or economics appealing to students.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What was your favorite board game growing up, and what valuable lesson or subject did it teach you?
Teresa CommerfordMiddle School High School Non-DepartmentalFebruary 16, 2017
I loved the Game of Life, and still do. It's fun to play with the tiny cars and "people". Kids have fun with the various scenarios, and they don't even realize they are learning! Students in my classroom, as well as my own children, have essentially worn out my board game. It desperately needs to be replaced.