Upper Elementary
Science

Using Creepy and Gross Science

Have you ever had a classroom full of kids who prefer to deal with all that's creepy, gross, or flat out disgusting? If so, this collection is for you. Not only will it prompt an immediate interest in science, but your students will come away knowing some very interesting (and disgusting) facts about every day life.
A Collection By Kendra Hadnott
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Using Creepy and Gross Science
  • That's Disgusting! Can You Read It Again?

    Website
    teachwithpicturebooks.blogspot.com
    teachwithpicturebooks.blogspot.com
    Kendra Hadnott says:
    Not only does this resource give you the name of a couple of books that deal with "gross" things, but there are also extension activities that follow. My personal favorite is The Butt Book. I have never had a classroom of students be uninterested while reading it.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    Students learn best when they are involved in the learning process. That's exactly what this article seeks to explain. The more you involve students, the more interested they'll be and the more they'll learn. Conducting disgusting science experiments is one definite way to get them up and moving, and interested.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    If you haven't quite given as much thought to which science experiments you can conduct that would be considered "gross" or "creepy," this guide will help you out. My personal favorite is the skin layer cake, which allows children to make a real edible "cake" based on the layers of skin.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    An explainer video that's perfect for giving students some food for thought. It poses the question of: Should We All Be Eating Insects? Use this video as an example of a gross science explainer video. Then, have students research a gross topic of their own and make their own videos or presentations!
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    This book is a dream come true for educators and children alike. Covering a wide range of topics, The Encyclopedia of Everything Nasty gives braves souls a look into some of the more disgusting parts of science. Let's face it: We educators know a lot, but we may not know why a vampire bat pees and drinks blood at the same time, or why an eel is covered in mucus. This book is good for expanding your general knowledge of all things nasty.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What area of science do your students show the most interest in? How can you use gross science in that area?