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English Language Arts

Whodunit: How Mystery Writing and Language Arts Relate

Do you have a classroom full of curious, inquisitive students? Use the intrigue of a good mystery to bring your students up to speed on language arts!
A Collection By Kendra Hadnott
  • 5 Collection Items
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Whodunit: How Mystery Writing and Language Arts Relate
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    Activities include reading a mystery, writing a mystery, and examining the way that grammar is used in mysteries.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    Children will enjoy learning from this resource for language arts teachers. Instead of some of the dryer books that teach about grammar and vocabulary, they'll learn from this intriguing mystery.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    This video introduces the mystery Skype method. A mystery Skype allows students from one classroom to craft questions for another classroom to figure out their location. In this particular example, a classroom from Illinois and Arizona had to guess each other's location. Use this method of learning to work on the grammar and sentence structure in your questions.
  • Kendra Hadnott says:
    Video writing prompts are great alternatives to the traditional verbal or written prompts. Students watch a short mystery video in which something dramatic happens. Once the video ends, they are tasked with writing the rest of the story.
  • theatlantic.com
    theatlantic.com

    Learning English via a Murder Mystery

    5 minute read
    Kendra Hadnott says:
    An account of how one creative language arts teacher uses murder mysteries to teach her students about grammar. These methods can be enhanced so that they cater to older, more mature students, or toned down for younger kids.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What are some other story genres that can be used to effectively teach language arts?