High School
English Language Arts

Shakes Alive: Teaching Shakespeare to High Schoolers

Shakespeare is intimidating or boring to teachers, let alone high school students. I wanted to teach my advanced and proficient level EFL students Shakespeare in an accessible way, and it turns out it's not only possible, but tons of fun! Here are some resources to help you turn Shakespeare's image around and make it a great learning experience for ALL involved. No line by line readings or students/teachers falling asleep at their desks, I promise!
A Collection By Krista Greiner
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Shakes Alive: Teaching Shakespeare to High Schoolers
  • newrepublic.com
    newrepublic.com

    Why Teach Shakespeare?

    2 minute read
    Krista Greiner says:
    There's been a lot of back and forth about whether Shakespeare should be taught to high schoolers. Shakespeare is not an easy task to tackle, but this article explains why it's worth it. It has been extremely worthwhile and fun to teach Shakespeare to my high-level ESOL students.
  • wsj.com
    wsj.com

    Teaching Shakespeare Straight Up

    30 minute read
    Krista Greiner says:
    This gives some really good insight on student contribution to Shakespeare. It's important to help students with understanding while simultaneously not getting in the way of their creative learning process. She provides some great insight on how to do that!
  • theguardian.com
    theguardian.com

    How to teach ... Shakespeare

    30 minute read
    Krista Greiner says:
    This article has loads of links and resources to teach and understand Shakespeare. It really is just a treasure trove of funny, unique, and eclectic resources (all British, which seems fitting given where Shakespeare was from). A few of the resources are paid and a few others need registration on The Guardian's server, but it's well worth giving out your email address for access.
  • Krista Greiner says:
    These creative, innovative resources include all materials needed to understand certain aspects of Shakespeare's plays and sonnets. They're usually several days long, but don't cover entire plays. However, The Folger is my favorite resource for all things Shakespeare and you can find full plays on the website. I'll list the link for Hamlet below.
  • pages.simonandschuster.com
    pages.simonandschuster.com

    Teaching Hamlet

    60 minute read
    Krista Greiner says:
    I used this with great success. It addresses key parts of the play, not the entirety (if you'd like full play analysis, see the Play by Play link). Students loved creating their own script and acting out their own interpretation of specific scenes. It was also helpful to watch clips from several screen adaptations.
  • Open Source Shakespeare

    Webtool
    opensourceshakespeare.org
    opensourceshakespeare.org
    Krista Greiner says:
    This site is mainly useful for the teacher. It's basically like Google, just for Shakespeare's works. You can cross-reference themes and find statistics. There is a lot of information, but it can be a bit overwhelming if you're not sure of what you're looking for.
  • Krista Greiner says:
    These handbooks and guides are fantastic if you're doing an in depth analysis of a play. The amount of information and research that went into these is incredible and could keep any classroom busy for a semester, so there's lots to choose from! It includes historical context information, worksheets, creative teaching ideas, critical reviews across time, really anything you could imagine or need for learning about or teaching a Shakespeare play is included.