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Classroom Management: The Good, the Bad, and the "I Can't Believe I Have to Say This…"

Classroom management can make or break a classroom, and with challenges like phones, distractions galore, changing educational climates, test anxiety and restlessness, and so much more, it can be hard for new teachers and veterans alike. I'll try to skip articles that mention the generic "set high expectations, enforce consequences, explain the rules" methods as much as possible and delve into the situational, the creative, and the well-tested ideas so that you can find the best fits for you.
A Collection By Margaret Frederick
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Classroom Management: The Good, the Bad, and the "I Can't Believe I Have to Say This…"
  • theeducatorsroom.com
    theeducatorsroom.com

    Crazy Things I've Done--Creative Classroom Management

    7 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    I love how these strategies are mostly positive, but they seem to have been effective. Some of them are a bit kooky, which may be a better fit for younger grades, but the theory behind them and the reinforcements are really solid.
  • teacher.scholastic.com
    teacher.scholastic.com

    Five Tricky Personalities - and How to Handle Them

    7 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    I like how this article specifically mentions personalities and behavior patterns rather than specific behaviors. Sometimes it's best to look at a behavior, but sometimes it's useful to look at overall patterns and personalities and manage them accordingly. This is a really clever guide to what escalates a situation and what defuses it when dealing with these personalities.
  • teaching.monster.com
    teaching.monster.com

    Classroom Discipline Tips: Dealing with Difficult Students & Parents

    7 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    This Q&A deals with something you don't often see in management tips: parents as well as students. There's plenty of documentation for helpful parents, but several teachers wrote in about students' problems that are only compounded by parental apathy or negativity. Although there is only so much a teacher can do, it's refreshing to see someone address this side of the issue so that you have a toolkit for any outcome of a parent communication.
  • educationworld.com
    educationworld.com

    Education World: Classroom Problem Solver

    10 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    This is a hub page to some of the most situational but useful tips I've found. There are answers to situations as simple as talking and as complex as hygiene issues and learning disorders linked on this page. It'd be a great resource if you're trying to solve a problem with specific incidents or students.
  • Margaret Frederick says:
    A full site, but it's worth looking into if you have computer access and want to make your class into a "game." There are content and behavior aspects, so it's a nice way to integrate technology and keep rewards cheap and fun. This works especially well if you have a lot of video gamers in your classroom since it plays a bit with game tropes.
  • thecornerstoneforteachers.com
    thecornerstoneforteachers.com

    15 creative & respectful ways to quiet a class

    7 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    Although this article has a bit of an aim toward younger grades, there's something for everyone in here. There's a lot to be gained from these quieting strategies, even if you need to adapt something to work for your style. I especially love the "check in" sign idea.
  • educationworld.com
    educationworld.com

    Classroom Management: Ten Teacher-Tested Tips

    7 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    This is an entry in the "tested and true" category that has representation for all grades, subjects, and potential problems. Some strategies will work at some levels better than others, but it is a nice list of strategies that teachers have successfully implemented into their classes.
  • Margaret Frederick says:
    I really like this strategy. It seems best for classes that meet for long periods of time or all day, but it's a really neat way to bring in real life economics lessons, teach personal and financial responsibility, and keep things positive. This can also align with some schools' PBIS (Positive Behavior Intervention System) programs, which is a bonus.