Middle School1 more
English Language Arts

Write Like A Champ

One of the biggest complaints I hear from teachers across the board is that students don't know how to communicate their thoughts in writing. This has a bit of a Language Arts focus, but it should be adaptable to any content area.
A Collection By Margaret Frederick
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Write Like A Champ
  • smashingmagazine.com
    smashingmagazine.com

    50 Free Resources That Will Improve Your Writing Skills

    6 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    Yet again, this list isn't necessarily aimed at academics, but as an English teacher, I like to have links like this on hand. A lot of the links deal with grammar, structure, and general skill help. When I have a student come to me after class and tell me that a specific aspect of writing feels weakest, I like to be able to pull up a list like this and make recommendations for independent skill checks and practice.
  • Margaret Frederick says:
    This is a really interesting list for teachers to consider simply because it frames writing problems as a professional issue, not an academic one. The goal of education, after all, is to prepare our students for the real world. Since there are a lot of real world professionals who complain that writing skills are in short supply, there are methods and skills that teachers can keep in mind as desired end goals and processes for their students.
  • learning.blogs.nytimes.com
    learning.blogs.nytimes.com

    Writing to Explain: Creating How-to Scripts and Demonstrations

    6 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    Another complaint I hear often is that students do not understand how to give effective directions, which can lead to confusing, rambling writing. This is a lesson idea that uses simple processes, but if the students can't articulate how to do the process, then the consequences are harmless but obvious. It also allows them to examine the ideas of audience and purpose further.
  • brighthubeducation.com
    brighthubeducation.com

    Three Creative Ideas for Expository Writing Mini Lessons: Perfect for Middle School Students

    5 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    These mini lessons take core concepts of academic and expository writing and make them far more relatable to most students' everyday lives. These can help students recognize that these communication skills are useful for more than just school essays.
  • Margaret Frederick says:
    I love how some of these writing ideas are academic and others are personal and explore different topics and formats. These can definitely help students break out of the mold of pure academic writing and allow them to explore writing and communicating in different formats. The National Writing Project is also an incredibly useful source of peer-reviewed writing instruction ideas.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Reimagining School Writing

    5 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    My students always tell me that they don't like writing because their writing is not only boring to do, but reads as boring. This article proposes some great alternatives to "boring" and formulaic informational writing. It also emphasizes writing as a process, rather than as a means to an end.
  • Margaret Frederick says:
    Although this is more of a hub page, I love how the creators of this page broke down the types of writing they may expect from students and gave links to ideas and specific content area collections so that teachers can explore what they really need at their leisure. It's a great jumping-off point, especially if you're dealing with the "Writing is only in English class" mentality.
  • apcentral.collegeboard.com
    apcentral.collegeboard.com

    SOAPSTone: A Strategy for Reading AND Writing

    6 minute read
    Margaret Frederick says:
    SOAPSTone is a strategy the College Board developed for Pre-AP courses, but I have used it in other environments with great success. It forces students to look at who they are as writers, examine audience and purpose, and really hone in on what they have to say and how they are going to say it. It takes a bit of training and instruction on the front end to make it successful, but it's so worth it once you get the students used to it.