Upper Elementary2 more
Science

Programs That Facilitate Family Science

Family science does not occur just at school. A host of programs exist to help families make science part of their lives. Math is a major tool of science, so the two often go hand in hand. The programs in this collection are found in most urban areas and mid-size cities and a few are made specifically for rural areas. Explore your options and have some fun.
A Collection By Mary Page
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Programs That Facilitate Family Science
  • Science Club for Girls

    Website
    scienceclubforgirls.org
    scienceclubforgirls.org
    Mary Page says:
    Being smart is looked down upon in the United States, so though females take many courses in college for science, they often do not finish the degrees or do not move up into research science. To combat this, Science Club for Girls focuses on making being smart awesome.
  • Mad Science

    Website
    madscience.org
    madscience.org
    Mary Page says:
    Mad Science is an enrichment provider. It is popular as an after-school program in Houston schools. The firm can be hired to do birthday parties and it located around the world. It's now a 30-year mission has proved popular in and outside of classes. Some other places they can be found is at camps, libraries, and special events. The science experiments chosen are fun and engaging.
  • Mary Page says:
    This site will save teachers and students endless amounts of time. Set up with a search engine, a student can query a topic idea for a project and explore several different aspects. Much better than the process I had to use in the classroom - plus it is 21st century. It also has a project guide portion making sure the student stays in science thinking. It has a directory of science camps.
  • Mary Page says:
    A series of inquiry-based science models for 3rd to 5th grade based on themes. They partner with the Lawrence Hall of Science. This is the same group that created the GEMS science modules for classroom teaching. These modules have the afterschool setup ​and are flexible.They are made for 4 sessions and plug into any supplement program out there.
  • Mary Page says:
    A global movement for students. It gives tutorials and lessons that introduce students to the discipline of computer science. It nurtures problem solving, creativity, and logic. Practical in nature when and when finished, the student has a product.
  • Mary Page says:
    Need a quest to change our world? The first organization aims to do just that. Made for high school it creates a sports-like atmosphere based on engineering a robot that has a task to do. The rules are strict, the budget limited, and resources limited. The teamwork it creates and the lessons learned last a lifetime.
  • Mary Page says:
    If you buy LEGOs as toys, which are highly recommended science toys, you get to join the Lego Club. The website lists hundreds of ways to use your Legos, but best of all has a contest and cool creations. Contests happen at the Kidfest for all ages. If you make something awesome, you can submit directions so others can build. I had LEGOS always available for students to use. Research shows it improves problem solving and spatial sense in math.
  • Mary Page says:
    4 H has plugged into the STEM education philosophy by making good science programs available even to the most rural areas. Its four-piece framework develops leadership in students. The process involves exploring, learning, practicing, and experiencing STEM careers. Its set up is teamwork oriented with a leader functioning as a coach or guide. I grew up in a rural area and did 4 H. It encourages girls to do science projects which we entered in a horse festival.
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BloomBoard Asks:What can I recommend to parents to increase overall science learning in their child?