Middle School1 more
Cross-Curricular

Exhibit A+: The Evidence Is In For Classroom Discussions

The need to teach students of all ages how to engage in evidence-based discussions is clear. There are several strategies teachers can use that not only help student engage in close reading of content, but they also help them support their discussions with evidence.
A Collection By Mary Ann Steutermann
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Exhibit A+: The Evidence Is In For Classroom Discussions
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Think great evidence-based discussions are only possible in the upper grades with advanced students? Think again! This video shows how a 4th-grade teacher creates an environment in which evidence-based discussion is not only possible but quite successful.
  • Socratic Seminars

    Activity
    readwritethink.org
    readwritethink.org
    Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Socratic Seminars are one type of classroom discussion that calls upon students to cite evidence for their contentions. This strategy guide prepares teachers to implement successful Socratic Seminars in any subject area.
  • imlovinlit.com
    imlovinlit.com

    Thursday Throw Down #4: Citing Text Evidence in Literature Response - I'm Lovin' Lit

    6 minute read
    Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    By using a simple mnemonic - ACE - the writer of this blog post was able to see dramatic improvements in students' ability to cite evidence in their writing. The post allows readers to clearly see the difference in the before and after versions of the ACE lesson, and there is even a link to an interactive notebook lesson that teachers can use.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    This printable document is free to download and gives students actual phrases to use that force them to connect supporting evidence to the points they make. It can be posted in the classroom or shared as a handout.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    This blog post provides practical tips for how teachers can prepare students before and manage them during class discussions to develop their skills providing evidence. Through the use of real-life examples, the author demonstrates what her suggestions actually "look" like during class. It also provides pictures of 10 different anchor charts that teachers have found successful in providing important cues to students during discussions.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    This glossary entry provides a comprehensive definition of the kind of "evidence" that students need to be able to effectively cite during class discussions. It provides a clear explanation of the concept and areas of debate in educational circles about the role of evidence in learning.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What strategies have you used in your classroom to help students use evidence to support their comments?