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Cross-Curricular

On the Make: The Maker Movement in the Classroom

Hands-on learning has been a goal of educators for a long time. But today's interest in STEM education has teachers modeling classroom learning in exciting new ways. Inspired by the Maker Faire put on each year by MAKE Magazine, the "Maker Movement" is helping to make STEM education come alive.
A Collection By Mary Ann Steutermann
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
On the Make: The Maker Movement in the Classroom
  • Maker Faire

    Website
    makerfaire.com
    makerfaire.com
    Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    First things first! This website discusses the Maker Faire, the annual "show and tell" that inspired the Marker Movement. Getting a look at some of the many images of fascinating things that have been "made" will not only inspire teachers to learn more about what's behind the movement but also demonstrate the amazing array of creative applications within STEM disciplines.
  • time.com
    time.com

    Why the Maker Movement Is Important to America's Future

    6 minute read
    Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    The Maker Movement isn't just an educational initiative of interest only to teachers. This Time Magazine article discusses why the movement has the potential for positive economic consequences. It details how "makers" support entrepreneurship, innovation, and economic growth across many sectors.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Wondering how to operate your classroom in a way that encourages a "maker" mindset? This chapter from the book The Maker Movement Manifesto outlines key principles of an environment that is conducive to innovation, discovery, and development of new things. Though not written for educators, this chapter provides great information on the tools and approaches that are key to a successful "maker" classroom.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Not sure how the "maker movement" translates from industry to education? This infographic clarifies this connection in easy-to-understand language and visuals. It also features "little bits," which is a system of electronic building blocks that are used today in numerous educational settings.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Perhaps the best way to understand how "maker" principles can be applied to classroom learning is to see it in action. This video shows groups of students of different ages and abilities making amazing new things. It demonstrates how teaching kids to be "makers" truly engages them in their learning, which leads to greater achievement and fewer disciplinary challenges.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    These slides were used in a workshop focused on "maker education." The first part addresses the "why" of the maker movement by explaining the theoretical background. Then they detail numerous strategies that can be used to make maker education come alive. The slides include links to actual examples, a self-assessment for teachers, suggestions for how students should document their process, and the role of the teacher throughout.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    This blog post begins by explaining maker education in layman's terms and then provides links to five great resources for teachers to use. They range from a summer "maker" camp for high school students to a website where students can "show and tell" their own creations. Also, a link for information on how to set up a "maker faire" at a teacher's own school is included.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Naturally, the interest in Maker Education is due to the importance of STEM. These PowerPoint slides clearly demonstrate how one middle school used a maker approach to improving instruction in science, technology, engineering, and math. Lots of resources for replicating their success are provided.
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BloomBoard Asks:What is something you have taught in a traditional way that could be enhanced by having students actually make or build a product?