High School
Cross-Curricular

Online and On Point: Teaching Online Courses

Advancements in technology have made it possible for students of all ages to learn at a distance as long as they have an Internet connection. But teaching online courses isn't the same as teaching regular classes in a physical classroom. This collection explores some of the issues involved and provides tips on how to be an effective online instructor.
A Collection By Mary Ann Steutermann
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Online and On Point: Teaching Online Courses
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    This article provides a research-based, theoretical discussion of the basics of online education. It begins by oulining basic principles of such courses, like student-led discussions, web-based tools, and peer interactivity. Emphasis is placed on teacher-student and student-student interaction. From there, the article discusses best practices in developing an online course and then provides an example of an excellent online educational program as an example.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    The first place to start when preparing to teach an online class doesn't deal with teaching strategies at all. Instead, it's rethinking how the course itself is designed. This hour-long video provides guidance to teachers developing online courses. Suggestions include rethinking the syllabus, deciding on a way to organize content, saving student files in PDF format, embedding links to "open educational resources," avoiding excessive email, and even grading from mobile devices.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Like the above video? Then you will LOVE this slide deck from a different presentation by the same author. It begins with helpful statistics that paint a picture of online learning in use today and then goes into tons more detail than the video on all parts of online teaching. This is a fantastic resource for those teaching on online class for the first time.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    The term "online learning" could cover both synchronous (in real time) and asynchronous (students accessing content at different times) methods. This four and a half minute video provides explanations and visuals for several programs and apps that allow teachers to stream video as well as facilitate virtual learning activities in synchronous, real-time virtual classes.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    This article covers 10 best practices for teaching online courses. While some are corollaries to best practices for physical classrooms, like using a variety of strategies, stopping to get feedback from students on their experience, and customizing learning, others involve tips for exclusively online environments, like providing links to digital content and managing discussion boards.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Although originally written for a higher education audience, this article's content is appropriate for secondary teachers as well. It provides 7 strategies for making online learning successful. In doing so, links to numerous web-based tools, like Jing, Adobe Connect, and Remind101, are provided.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Written by a seasoned online educator, this blog post covers 10 lessons learned after years in the trenches. Some are basic, like the fact that online learning is not easy. Others are clearly the product of hard-won wisdom, like the importance of timely feedback and deadlines as well as how online instruction can make a person a better brick-and-mortar classroom teacher.
  • Mary Ann Steutermann says:
    Not just teaching an online course but developing an entire online learning program? Then this guide from the National Education Association is exactly what you need! It provides system-level suggestions for designing and implementing an entire online educational program.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What is something that you do differently as an instructor of an online course than you would do in a physical classroom?