High School
Cross-Curricular

I Need a Hero: Teaching the Hero's Journey in High School

The number of superheroes making an appearance in movie theaters and on TV these days - no pun intended - is on steroids. While you may be on comic book character overload, the superhero genre makes teaching about archetypes, heroes, and villains more accessible than ever.
A Collection By Megan McClure
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
I Need a Hero: Teaching the Hero's Journey in High School
  • Multi-Media Hero Analysis

    Lesson plan
    artsedge.kennedy-center.org
    artsedge.kennedy-center.org
    Megan McClure says:
    The Kennedy Center's ArtsEdge features a lesson plan that examines the hero's journey in art, poetry, and children's literature.
  • MythologyTeacher.com

    Website
    mythologyteacher.com
    mythologyteacher.com
    Megan McClure says:
    This website is an incredible resource, chocked full of links to articles, worksheets, videos, and songs to integrate into your Hero's Journey lesson plans.
  • Plot Structure Diagram

    Activity
    ungerkr.files.wordpress.com
    ungerkr.files.wordpress.com
    Megan McClure says:
    I would recommend using this worksheet for students in ninth or tenth grade, as the older kids have likely seen this diagram ad nauseum by the time they reach eleventh and twelfth grade. The Plot Structure Diagram is a great way to get into the nooks and crannies of every plot point the hero travels throughout a story.
  • Megan McClure says:
    This handy graphic offers a summarized breakdown of the 17 stages a hero journies through, according to Campbell and his book The Man with a Thousand Faces (which, by the way, is a must-have text for any writer or lover of all things archetypal).
  • huffingtonpost.com
    huffingtonpost.com

    Why I Seldom Teach The Hero's Journey Anymore -- And What I Teach Instead

    8 minute read
    Megan McClure says:
    Craig Chalquist acknowledges the antihero's increased popularity in the current media landscape. In addition, he believes people overidentify with the hero in American culture, and, as a result, teaches what he calls, "The Journey of Reenactment."
  • Megan McClure says:
    This is a great two-week lesson that introduces students to Joseph Campbell and Carl Jung, two people synonymous with the hero's journey and archetypes, respectively. The readings and activities provided also help students make connections between culture, society, and their own lives, using the hero's journey as a framework.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What literature, movies, or other media have you used to highlight the hero - or anti-hero's journey?