High School
English Language Arts

Shall I Compare Thee to a Bale of Hay? - Fun With Sonnets

I am a huge fan of Shakespeare, as well as a huge fan of poetry, but I am often the minority on both counts. There are six resources listed in this collection that offer surefire ways to convert any student with an aversion to sonnets and the man who made them famous.
A Collection By Megan McClure
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Shall I Compare Thee to a Bale of Hay? - Fun With Sonnets
  • The Poetry Place - Sonnet

    Lesson plan
    thepoetryplace.wordpress.com
    thepoetryplace.wordpress.com
    Megan McClure says:
    This is a lesson plan which analyzes the various types of sonnets, including Petrarchan, Shakespearean and caudate, and encourages students to try their hand at writing any or all of the aforementioned sonnet types.
  • The Poetics of Hip-Hop

    Lesson plan
    artsedge.kennedy-center.org
    artsedge.kennedy-center.org
    Megan McClure says:
    Music might be the quickest way to engage students in learning poetry, and this lesson uses hip-hop music to teach form, diction, and rhythm in Shakespearean sonnets.
  • Megan McClure says:
    There are a number of sonnets written by African American authors and they offer a great alternative to teaching sonnets by way of Shakespeare. The subject matter is oft-times more relatable than that of the man who made the sonnet famous, which, in turn, can spark some interesting class discussions and increase levels of engagement.
  • Megan McClure says:
    I have used the Sonnet #18 parody idea in my own twelfth grade ELA classroom, and my students had a lot of fun with it. Working with iambic pentameter can be challenging, as can coming up with the wittiest subject matter, however, watching my students get into a creative groove writing their sonnets was an awesome sight.
  • Megan McClure says:
    Face it, uttering Shakespeare's name in a classroom could easily elicit groans. I've watched students eyes glaze and listened to them complain the language is too difficult to understand. This would have been a great resource to have, as it offers fun and easy ways to access the Shakespearean sonnet.
  • Megan McClure says:
    This lesson plan, centered around "Sonnet 130," or "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun," moves beyond simply analyzing the poem for conventions such as metaphor and alliteration. The lesson also encourages students to delve into the meaning of the poem by relating the subject matter to their own lives.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:In what ways have you increased students' interest through teaching sonnets?