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English Language Arts

You Talkin' to Me? Teaching Point of View to Any Grade

Teaching the various types of point view present in literature gives students an opportunity to use their skills of analyzation and critical thinking. Students' ability to distinguish between the different types of point of view will also help them come standardized test time, as students are often asked to identify a narrator's point of view.
A Collection By Megan McClure
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
You Talkin' to Me? Teaching Point of View to Any Grade
  • Point of View

    Lesson plan
    laurel.kyschools.us
    laurel.kyschools.us
    Megan McClure says:
    Here is another lesson plan, this one is intended for high school students and meant to serve as a foundation lesson in learning point of view.
  • Megan McClure says:
    This lesson plan, geared toward elementary school students, has been used in the middle school setting to much success. Using The True Story of the Three Little Pigsas a gateway into examining and understanding point of view, students read the text, answer questions, and review what they learned with a fun game.
  • Megan McClure says:
    Mondays with Mandy dives into teaching the elusive second person point of view. Acknowledging the fact that not many novels are told in second person POV, Mandy turns to picture books and explains how to utilize them as early as kindergarten and as late as eighth grade.
  • Megan McClure says:
    EDSITEment, a humanities website, boasts a great lesson plan using Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart," and a number of other texts to teach the unreliable narrator point of view in literature.
  • Megan McClure says:
    With a running time just under ten minutes, this short, animated video does a thorough and comprehensive explanation of first and third person narration, as well as the various sub-types of narration, including reliable, unreliable, third person limited, and third person omniscient.
  • Megan McClure says:
    Excerpted from Take 10 Reading: Improving Student Literacy in 10 Minutes a Day this lesson plan examines point of view using various non-fiction texts. The lesson plan talks you through whole-class discussion, as well as individual practice and even offers a script of what to say to the class, should you get stuck.
  • Point of View Worksheets

    Website
    ereadingworksheets.com
    ereadingworksheets.com
    Megan McClure says:
    E-Reading Worksheets is an excellent resource with a wealth of free, printable worksheets. This page, in particular, offers worksheets relating to point of view and can be used for grades 2-10.
  • Megan McClure says:
    Featured on ReadWriteThink, this lesson plan is intended for middle schoolers, grades 6-8. There are a number of cool resources to work with, including writing a fractured fairy tale. Students read a popular fairy tale and then alter it in various ways to examine and explore various types of point of view.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What literary works have you used to teach the various types of point of view?