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Cross-Curricular

Classroom Fun with Content Review & Critical Thinking Games

Have you ever wondered how to spice up your instruction or review materials? There are a number of traditional ways to teach, review and assess content and skills, but often students get bored and lose interest. Games spice up the classroom and teach at the same time. Students won't recognize that they are using critical thinking skills and collaboration because they are laughing and learning at the same time. Try some or all of these games - I promise that you will not be disappointed.
A Collection By Melissa Mirabello
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Classroom Fun with Content Review & Critical Thinking Games
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    I love this mix of games that make learning and reviewing fun for students. Many of the students liked the "Bluff" game because it reminded them of the card game "I doubt it." Some of the games include physical activity which is good for energizing students during long blocks. Graffiti is also a great review game; I modified it a little bit by allowing students to draw as well as write ideas.
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    classroom.synonym.com

    Test Review Games for High School | The Classroom | Synonym

    5 minute read
    Melissa Mirabello says:
    I have played definition BINGO quite often in class and the students love the competitive nature of the game. Onion Ball is another great review game because the students like peeling off the layers - each question becomes a mystery that needs to be solved.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    It is always beneficial to look beyond your environment to learn about how other cities, states, and countries are teaching and motivating their students. This adventure game gives students the opportunity to make decisions regarding ethical dilemmas. It is a modern, engaging game for today's students. Caution: be sure you get permission from your administrator prior to using this game in class.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    It is very important to mix instruction with student participation. Oftentimes, teachers are spending an inordinate amount of time lecturing instead of allowing students the opportunity to showcase their knowledge. Whether writing a mystery or being a tour guide, these fun activities and games put the students in the driver's seat.
  • Card and Board Games

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    Melissa Mirabello says:
    These games are great for supplementing both instructional material and acquired skills. Students will initially think that they are merely playing a game; however, they will soon understand the "method to your madness." Whether learning the importance of terms, collaboration, or critical thinking, students will have a great time with these games.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    Most students are naturally competitive so these games work well to motivate learning and review. Fly Swatter is particularly fun - kids enjoy running up to the board and interacting with the material in a physical manner. I like the author's idea to have students name their teams and cheer for each other. The final "game" is really not a game per se, but a way to teach kids about how perception can be manipulated with language and signals.
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BloomBoard Asks:How can I use a game to teach?