High School
Cross-Curricular

Media Ethics: Simple Lessons in Manipulation

Do students understand how media is used to convey messages? Do they truly comprehend how words and images can distort, sell, entice? This collection is a small sampling of the media's power to transmit a message. Students enjoy these samples and often share their own experiences with media manipulation.
A Collection By Melissa Mirabello
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Media Ethics: Simple Lessons in Manipulation
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    This is the video in which a comedian pretends to be a chef. The comedian is outrageous, however, the newscaster is so focused on the job that his antics are accepted as truth. My students laughed hysterically while watching and discussing this video.
  • imediaethics.org
    imediaethics.org

    Fake Chef Not Fact checked, Dupes 5 TV Morning Shows

    6 minute read
    Melissa Mirabello says:
    My students loved hearing about comedian Nick Prueher's success at duping the media. His antics prove that the media does not spend enough time fact-checking its sources. I use this article and the video in source 6 to show students that they cannot merely trust whatever they see.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    On this site, you will find thousands of political cartoons that students can look at and display on a projector for class analysis. Students will ponder the following: What is the message? How is it conveyed? Who is the audience? Is the message effective? Is it offensive? How is this cartoon a reflection of free speech?
  • washingtonpost.com
    washingtonpost.com

    The Power of the Pencil

    4 minute read
    Melissa Mirabello says:
    Students like to talk about the effect of one picture or one word - its ability to change minds or sell an idea when reading this article on the power of political cartoons and their ability to convey a message. After reading this article, I ask my students to spend time looking at political cartoons (resource 4) and then we share and analyze them in class.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    This is a fantastic resource to share with students. I used it for over ten years while teaching Media Ethics. The site offers videos and commentaries on the media's powerful effect on our lives. Go to the tab "Films A-Z," click on a film and watch its trailer. Usually, the trailer alone prompts deep class discussions about media manipulation.