High School
English Language Arts

Sense of Place: The House on Mango Street

Is it true that one's home is where the heart is? Sandra Cisneros's book gives new meaning to the sense of home and the development of self. Whether reading the book online, being exposing to Latino culture, listening to a Cisneros interview, or imitating her style, students learn about and experience the complexities of growing up.
A Collection By Melissa Mirabello
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Sense of Place: The House on Mango Street
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    I have used this site - assigning different tabs per group so that the students have the opportunity to learn about Sandra Cisneros (as a writer and so much more). It is rare that students get to read books written by LIVING, active writers!
  • teachervision.com
    teachervision.com

    The House on Mango Street

    5 minute read
    Melissa Mirabello says:
    This resource is also helpful when creating lessons for the book. It includes discussion questions, potential projects, research ideas, and group activities. Also, the writing activities include graphic organizers that really help students with special needs or learning disabilities.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    I love this resource because it gives a plethora of ideas for teaching the book. I adapted many of the lessons to my plans for the novel. The students enjoyed writing their own poetry (page 3) and the gender/role-playing assignments on pages 8-9. There is also a very effective lesson on point of view (pages T15-16). Actually, the entire resource is extremely valuable for teaching the book.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    Supplemental materials are essential for sparking connections and tapping into students' multiple intelligences. I asked students to make a trailer for a movie of The House on Mango Street. These are not my students and this trailer is too long (my students were limited to 1:30 minutes), but it serves as a good example for a trailer assignment. It includes video, audio, and voice over narration - thus, the project showcases many of the students' skills.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    This video sparks a great conversation about what it means to find oneself, to build one's own "house" or identity. Students rarely talk or write about the literal and figurative meanings for the word "house"; however, after reading the book and listening to Cisneros, I was able to weave the concept of a "house" in our discussion of many other books during the school year.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    If you have questions about how to teach or why you should teach the text, this site addresses those concerns. There are several websites listed as resources, a sample student project, a 3-day lesson plan, Sandra Cisneros's text reading, and much more. Basically, the site shares the importance of teaching the book because of its rich lessons for identity, race, gender, and culture. Finally, it also addresses how to READ the text - with a focus on specific diction and word formation.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    Teachers will benefit from this step-by-step resource for how to teach the book. In three weeks, the teacher will guide students through a series of activities such as vignette writing, group research, and style exercises. Because this teacher's class is heterogeneous and includes students with special needs, the plans are diverse enough for all teachers to use and/or modify with ease.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What does home mean to you?