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Cross-Curricular

Teacher as a Leader Inside and Outside the Classroom

Education is transient by nature and continuous improvement necessitates adaptability and calculated risks. Teachers can choose to remain in their classroom and lead from within or they can branch out and lead both inside and outside of the classroom. This branching out has a more pervasive positive effect on the school and community.
A Collection By Melissa Mirabello
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Teacher as a Leader Inside and Outside the Classroom
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    According to Theo Wubbels, an expert in teacher training, the foremost skill in leadership is a teacher’s capacity to adapt. Teachers from all over the globe give their valuable advice with articles to support their ideas. Sometimes, different levels, classes or personal experiences necessitate novel or revised leadership approaches.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    There are many ways that a teacher can develop his/her leadership capacity. This article gives many examples of teachers who presented at conferences and worked with their colleagues to improve both their individual and teacher leadership abilities. One teacher described how she used her learning experiences to teach her kids about writing proposals, blogging, handling nerves, and collaborating on technology.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    This is one of the most refreshing and practical articles I have read about teaching in a very long time. I love the ideas in it: lead with imperfection; lead with relationships; and lead with self-control are just a few of the insightful ones. The humanistic nature of these strategies are more important than hyper attention to texts. One ought to build a relationship of trust and concern prior to expecting motivation and respect.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    Teacher leadership can occur in the classroom, in the hallways, during meetings or in the community. Teachers have a profound effect on their students and colleagues. In this video, three teachers talk about their paths to leadership: advocacy, building gardens, and promoting national board certification. Their inspirational ideas are valuable to all teachers, especially those desiring a larger role in leadership.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    Shifting the cognitive load from strictly teachers to students and administrators is a smart approach for school improvement. When administrators get into the classrooms and interact with the students via discussion or productive groups, the classroom experience broadens and deepens. making students autonomy and self-actualized. Sarah Brown Wessling's goal for students to become autonomous and self-actualized ties into teacher leadership and shared cognitive loads.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    One of the most important routines for all teachers to engage in is reflective practice: thinking about his/her craft. This particular teacher talks about the benefits of his differentiated role - teaching half day and then working with a mentor or colleague to reflect and learn from one another. Leadership begins when teachers listen to others and share their experiences and knowledge for the betterment of all students.
  • ascd.org
    ascd.org

    Ten Roles for Teacher Leaders

    10 minute read
    Melissa Mirabello says:
    I love this article about the many roles that a teacher plays in the classroom. My two favorite roles are teachers as visionaries or catalysts for change and learners. Effective teachers have open minds and hearts. They learn from their students and colleagues and grow every day in their craft. Furthermore, the more roles or "hats" a teacher can "wear," the better he/she demonstrates his/her dynamic position in the school.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:How can you learn, develop, and share leadership skills?