High School
English Language Arts1 more

Vox Pops to Engage Students

This collection features ways in which teachers can use broadcast conventions to foster interest and enthusiasm in literature. My students loved the vox pop - voice of the people- assignment in which they interviewed classmates, teachers, and random citizens about their favorite books or authors.
A Collection By Melissa Mirabello
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Vox Pops to Engage Students
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    Click on this radio segment to hear artists talk about how difficult it is to obtain a job and make a living as an artist in America. I had my students focus on all the audio elements in the piece. They liked the piano and typewriter as backdrops to the artists's confessions.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    My students liked this question as well: Worst Christmas Present Ever Received? They used this question as well and enjoyed responses. Although these examples do not talk about literature, they gave students ideas for their own vox pop video segments.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    My students liked this question: What would you be doing differently with your life if you had one year to live? They used the question and had fun creating a vox pop from the responses.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    This gentleman has excellent suggestions for visual and audio components of the video vox pop. I showed it to my students and his hints were very useful to them. I also witnessed his words put to action in their video vox pops.
  • Melissa Mirabello says:
    A really good source for explaining the vox pop to students. Sometimes I had the students read it prior to coming to class. Other times, we read it together. It is good to give the concept before you show or listen to examples. Kids quickly get caught up in the production before thinking about the writing and equipment necessary for the vox pop. Pre-production information on this site is very helpful.