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Cross-Curricular

Fingerspelling: A Fun and Useful Skill

Fingerspelling is essentially using your fingers/hands to make letters to spell words to communicate. It's especially helpful when communicating with a person who is hard of hearing. It's part of American Sign Language and I was fortunate enough to have ASL classes taught by an interpreter when I was in elementary school (a student in our class was deaf). As a teacher, I have taught a few different classes to fingerspell and they absolutely love it!
A Collection By Melissa Williams
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Fingerspelling: A Fun and Useful Skill
  • Melissa Williams says:
    There are many benefits to learning this form of communication (and the possibility of extending it to learning to sign songs, another very memorable activity I was fortunate enough to participate in as a child). Engage your students' multiple intelligences, stimulate phonemic awareness and so much more. Read up on all the benefits of teaching fingerspelling or any ASL to your students.
  • Melissa Williams says:
    Probably best for a Grade 5-8 class, this worksheet will help test students' knowledge of fingerspelling while they crack the code to determine the quote.
  • Melissa Williams says:
    A great choice to use as a handout. It's presented clearly and gives students a reference to use. I've used a similar chart, made a copy for each student, given them time to look it over and to try and spell their names etc and in very little time they were excitedly using their new 'secret' language to communicate with their classmates. So much fun, beneficial to student learning, and very useful when communicating with anyone who understands ASL and particularly the hard of hearing or deaf.
  • Melissa Williams says:
    This is a short video showing the alphabet song with fingerspelling of each letter. This is a good resource to use that will help students learn each letter while re-enforcing their knowledge of the alphabet (for the younger grades). It's been proven that children are the ones who can most easily learn new languages, so the early years are the perfect time to introduce this mode of communication.
  • Melissa Williams says:
    A fun, interactive game for you and your students to use while learning and perfecting your fingerspelling skills.
  • Melissa Williams says:
    This is the place to start! Check out the chart to see what different characters look like when using your fingers and test your knowledge too. Become a fingerspelling expert in no time, with a little practice. Then you'll be ready to teach it to your students and you can use this site on your SMART board to help them learn too.
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