Middle School1 more
Science

Making Media for Healthy Living

Many media literacy educators believe that the best way to learn critical awareness of media messages is to make media yourself. This collection features lesson plans, case study videos, student made media samples, and process frameworks that educators can use for Teaching Student Media Production to Promote Health Messages.
A Collection By Michael RobbGrieco
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Making Media for Healthy Living
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    The Media Spot's PSA approach illustrated with videos of the process and examples of student products: students watch examples of PSAs, research an issue, take a position, decide on a tone, write, then adapt writing into video scripts using storyboard graphic organizers. Students form production groups where they either produce their own PSA, or work on discreet parts of a collaborative whole-class PSA. This process can be customized for any class!
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    Lesson plans for every step of the process, including studying public service announcements, brainstorming ideas, pitching a concept, forming a production team, storyboarding, planning prdocution, shooting, editing, and reflecting. The non-profit Rock Your World site also features resources for finding passions, researching issues, and making media campaigns (and writing songs!). Designed for middle and high school, but many lessons adaptable for younger grades.
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    Find out how students can use the free Media-Breaker tool for remixing online videos to call out questionable health messages and limiting media representations. Students 6-12 can change sequence and add commentary to videos to reframe harmful messages as public service announcements. A great way to turn analysis into action! Links feature samples of student remixes, and tutorials for getting started with your classes on Media-Breaker. From the Learning About Media Project (The LAMP, in NYC).
  • The Power of the PSA

    Website
    discovermedialiteracy.com
    discovermedialiteracy.com
    Michael RobbGrieco says:
    Can primary and elementary students activate media literacy to make public service announcements for health messages? Yes we can! A case study video of classroom practice and examples of 2nd/3rd grade PSA's accompany this series of lesson plans, featuring a 10 step production process. From the Powerful Voices for Kids project in Philadelphia, this is a companion website to the book Discovering Media Literacy: Teaching Digital Media & Popular Culture in Elementary School by Hoobs & Moore.
  • themediaspot.org
    themediaspot.org

    The Middle School PSA Guide

    Article
    Michael RobbGrieco says:
    From Rhys Daunic at the Media Spot: "The guide is designed to help a teacher, new to filmmaking, in 3 days facilitate small group adaptations of persuasive essays on food insecurity into public service announcements (PSAs) which will include scientific findings, and student-generated data on the subject."
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    Jason Ohler outlines the many areas of media production process in which students can demonstrate learning and proficiency, and that teachers can assess. Ohler's rubric approach needs to be adapted for proficiency based assessment, but the areas of learning through media production and the descriptions of quality performance may be useful to many teachers.
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    This resource helps answer the question: "I'm not a media production expert, so how can I assess my student's media work?" A great overview of models for developing different sorts of rubrics, including for all elements of multimedia production.
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    Explore middle school lessons 10-12 or high school lessons 9-12 for a wide range of examples and resources to engage students in creating their own media to counter, question, debate or remix prominent media messages about drugs and alcohol. Chapter 12 in both curricula focuses on creating effective PSA's about drugs and alcohol. Created by media literacy leaders Renee Hobbs, David Moore, and Katie Donnelly for Drug Free PA.