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Science

Teaching Media Analysis, Evaluating Health-related Messages

Learning to think critically about media messages is a key component in developing healthy decision-making for youth who are exposed to mixed messages about food, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, relationships, sex, gender and race. Learn the key questions students can ask to analyze and evaluate any media, and examine free lesson plans from leading experts in media literacy education for helping students understand and respond to dubious media messages that impact health and well being.
A Collection By Michael RobbGrieco
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Teaching Media Analysis, Evaluating Health-related Messages
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    Canada's framework for digital literacy offers teachers from K-12 a wide range of lessons and resources to support media literacy. Click on your students grade level band(s) and look for the blue smiley face icon for "Digital Health" to find developmentally appropriate, up-to-date lessons for addressing issues including nutrition, body image, violence, race and gender representation, and sex. Lessons focus on analyzing media, but also include students as media makers.
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    The Media Literacy Clearinghouse provides a wealth of resources for teachers to engage students in becoming critical of media messages about alcohol use. Explore everything from introductions to key concepts and questions, to collections of video and print ads with lesson plans for individual and group analysis. Click on "Teaching Standards" to find more links to media literacy collections related to specific health standards and other academic areas.
  • ww2.kqed.org
    ww2.kqed.org

    Developing a “Healthy” Skepticism of Media Claims

    Article
    Michael RobbGrieco says:
    A middle school science teacher describes how her students analyzed health journalism, then researched and told their own stories on health news.
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    Lesson plans and how-to resources support doing media analysis with young learners from the Powerful Voices for Kids project in Philadelphia in this companion website to the book Discovering Media Literacy: Teaching Digital Media & Popular Culture in Elementary School by Hobbs & Moore. The real gold here is CASE STUDY VIDEOS of teachers and students doing media analysis in class. Many examples involve exploring health issues by deconstructing ads with elementary students.
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    A concise introduction to media literacy as an analytic practice, this 3min video presents 5 key questions to unlock the meaning of media messages. From the education policy advocate Media Literacy Now!, this recent video puts the five key questions of media literacy in the context of current media issues, including influences on health and health policy. These questions, originally posed by the Center for Media Literacy in the 1990s, can be used with students K-12 for media analysis.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Social Media Literacy: The 5 Key Concepts

    Article
    Michael RobbGrieco says:
    This article revisits the 5 key concepts for thinking about media in terms of the social media that most youth participate in their digital cultures growing up today. Stacey Goodman's discussion supports teachers in thinking about how media analysis isn't just about messages produced by big media outlets, but also messages shared and made by us and our students in social media.
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    This amazing collection of vintage print advertisements for medicinal products makes a great resource for practicing media literacy analysis, and for comparing to today's drug advertising and health marketing.
  • Michael RobbGrieco says:
    Explore middle school lessons 3-9 or high school lessons 1-8 for a wide range of examples and resources to engage students in analyzing media messages about drugs and alcohol in a variety of activities for examining ads, news, music, movies, reality TV and viral video. Created by media literacy leaders Renee Hobbs, David Moore, and Katie Donnelly for Drug Free PA.