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Cross-Curricular

A Plan for Peace

The International Day of Peace is celebrated every year on September 21. Celebrate with your students with some of these suggestions.
A Collection By Natalie Mroz
  • 10 Collection Items
  • 10 Collection Items
  • Discussion
A Plan for Peace
  • The Peace One Day

    Website
    content.yudu.com
    content.yudu.com
    Natalie Mroz says:
    Here you will find a complete resource for everything you want to know about peace, Peace Day, and class activities. It's a very easy to use booklet that you can flip through on your computer.
  • What is peace?

    Website
    international-alert.org
    international-alert.org
    Natalie Mroz says:
    It's short and sweet, but it's a great explanation of what peace means. Share it with your students and see if they have anything to add to the description.
  • How to Make Peace Flags

    Website
    thepeaceflagproject.org
    thepeaceflagproject.org
    Natalie Mroz says:
    A simple project to promote peace at your school, have your students create a peace flag. You can read about the history and meaning of the peace flags and their colors. Then, have your students decorate a square of fabric with a message of peace. Following tradition, the flags should be flown until they disintegrate, which spreads the messages on the wind.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park was established to provide reminders of the horrors of atomic bombs and to promote peace. Visit the website for general information, but be sure to click on the link to the Kids Peace Station to learn even more about Sadako and for links to further information for children. You can even find out how to send a peace letter or make a chain of paper cranes to be hung at Sadako's statue.
  • huffingtonpost.com
    huffingtonpost.com

    The Girl Who Transformed the Paper Crane Into the Symbol for Peace and Hope

    8 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    Sadako's brother retells the terrifying day of the bombing of Hiroshima and shares Sadako's story in this article. He teaches that you "if you don’t create a small peace, you can’t create a bigger peace." This would be a great discussion topic for your students.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    The legend of the paper cranes goes back a long time in Japanese history, but it comes to life in the story of Sadako Sasaki who contraced leukemia after exposure to the bombing of Hiroshima. Learn about Sadako and her thousand paper cranes here. You might also like to read the book with your students.
  • Origami Crane

    Activity
    origami-instructions.com
    origami-instructions.com
    Natalie Mroz says:
    Paper cranes are a symbol for peace. You and your students can fold your own paper cranes following these instructions. I always had my students write a message of peace on the back of the origami paper before folding their cranes. If money is tight, you can cut squares from magazine pages; they are a good substitute for origami paper, which can be expensive.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    ReadWriteThink developed this lesson for students in grades 3-5, but you could easily adapt it for older or younger students. You can use this lesson as a template for creating your own activity for writing peace poems. Or, you can use the lesson as is.
  • Actions

    Website
    internationaldayofpeace.org
    internationaldayofpeace.org
    Natalie Mroz says:
    On this page you can find many ideas from simple to more elaborate--many of which you can use with your students. You and your students can browse the suggestions and choose one or two to try.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    The United Nations explains the history of the International Day of Peace. It's good background information for the teacher and older students. This site also offers other resources through various links.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:"Peace Day" started in 1981. What's different about peace in the world today?