Middle School
Science

Whether It's Raining or Sunny, It's Weather-Related

These resources will help you put together an awesome unit on the weather--or just pull together a quick lesson after a weather-related disaster to help your students understand what is going on. It also includes two articles dealing with some of the difficulties or controversy in teaching about climate change. Be prepared with these resources.
A Collection By Natalie Mroz
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Whether It's Raining or Sunny, It's Weather-Related
  • motherjones.com
    motherjones.com

    A shocking number of teachers are telling kids global warming isn't real

    5 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    You better read this article (and any others) about the controversy in teaching about climate change or global warming and be prepared to answer questions from students and parents.
  • hdgc.epp.cmu.edu
    hdgc.epp.cmu.edu

    Teachers Guide on Climate Change and Global Warming

    7 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    No study of weather would be complete without a lesson or discussion on climate change. This source is excellent background material for the teacher in order to provide scientific information on the topic. It starts with the "Top Ten Things You Need to Know about Global Warming" and continues with "Why So Much Controversy?" You will also find links to many other resources, but be sure to start with the "Top Ten" and "Controversy" articles.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This is just what the title says: a map showing current wind patterns and speeds. It's beautiful to look at and could create a lot of discussion about what weather might be happening at the moment.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    Another offering from Discovery Education in partnership with The Weather Channel, this source includes videos about tornadoes, wild fires, ice storms, and hurricanes along with activities and information for preparedness. Student groups could each focus on one topic and share what they learn with the class. Activities are available for grades 3-5 and 6-8.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    Discovery Education shows students how to create devices they would need to build their own weather stations at home of for class use. Each device comes with a detailed information sheet and instructions. Some of the materials may be difficult to find, but your enterprising students will be able to work together to come up with what they need to build their weather stations.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    NOAA created this lesson for students to analyze patterns in weather and draw conclusions about what they see in their weather maps. It is an excellent lesson for reviewing weather information and including some literacy and higher-level thinking skills in your classes.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    Have your students plan a trip to somewhere in the U.S. and then use this map to discover what weather conditions will be like on the road.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    I think a great activity would be to have your kids look at these weather sayings and do some research to find out where the saying comes from and whether it has any basis in science. Teams of students could put together a fun presentation for the rest of the class or to post online.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    Teachers will find this resource to contain a wealth of information to use in planning lessons and learning about weather before teaching a unit. More advanced students could also visit this site for a challenge activity. You will find everything you need here on any weather topic--along with lesson plans and other resources. I would use this site first and probably eliminate the textbook!
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What is your favorite weather-related topic to teach about? Can you share any tips on it?