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History & Social Studies

Don't Cross that Line: Teaching about Borders

Understanding what a political border is and how they have been created throughout history is important to helping students understand some of the issues facing the world today. Teach your students how borders have been drawn and changed over time and what it means to create a state.
A Collection By Natalie Mroz
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Don't Cross that Line: Teaching about Borders
  • news.nationalgeographic.com
    news.nationalgeographic.com

    6 of the World's Most Worrisome Disputed Territories

    20 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    These six case studies of areas in the world with border disputes could be used as the basis for a class activity where students try to negotiate to settle the dispute. They could use the information provided and conduct additional research to try to figure the best plan for drawing a border.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This is an online quiz asking students to identify the feature that separates the countries. It is a good companion to use, so that students can understand more clearly how some borders are not arbitrary but are ready-made by nature. Students won't know most of the answers but having to look them up will help get the point across.
  • education.nationalgeographic.org
    education.nationalgeographic.org

    Borders

    10 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    From the National Geographic online encyclopedia, this information about borders covers the topic and includes a few important examples from Korea to Africa. An excellent explanation, it also includes pictures of examples of some interesting borders around the world.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    It is very interesting to watch the countries change shape over time. This is a great visual for your students.
  • oddee.com
    oddee.com

    9 Awesome Things To Do on Country Borders

    Article
    Natalie Mroz says:
    This is just for fun for you and your students. You will be amazed by some of the border activities you read about here. I would especially like to ring the doorbells mentioned in number 9!
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    Your students may be surprised by the sheer number of disputed borders in the world. This interactive map shows all current disputes. You can click on each to get a close up and a little bit of additional information on the dispute.
  • globalpolicy.org
    globalpolicy.org

    Nations and States

    20 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    I love this reference for explaining in clear and simple language what the difference is between a nation and a state. If you can't understand this concept, you will have a difficult time talking about the borders states draw. It's a great place for the teacher to go to for background and for older students as well.
  • Beyond Borders

    Lesson plan
    education.nationalgeographic.org
    education.nationalgeographic.org
    Natalie Mroz says:
    This is an excellent resource, written by National Geographic, that explains everything you and your students need to know about what borders are and how they are or may have been developed for countries. It is a series of 10 lessons. You could use any or all of them to help your students learn about borders. I especially like lesson 1 as an introduction to the idea of borders and the differences between nations and states.