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History & Social Studies

Teaching Triangular Trade: Understanding the Slave Trade

One of the most significant moments in world history, the Triangular Trade, which lasted for around 400 years, is a sensitive topic but a very important one to teach. Here are some resources you can use to make the planning a little easier.
A Collection By Natalie Mroz
  • 11 Collection Items
  • 11 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Teaching Triangular Trade: Understanding the Slave Trade
  • pbs.org
    pbs.org

    Africans in America/Part 1/Interior of a Slave Ship

    1 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    The image on this page shows how enslaved people may have been crowded into ships for the journey across the Atlantic. This image could be used as an introductory "hook" to interest students in the lesson or as the basis for a document-based-question activity.
  • unesco.org
    unesco.org

    The Slave Route

    5 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    Here you will find a set of maps that show details of the Triangular Trade routes and goods and people moved. This is a good visual for showing where the enslaved people came from and the stops along their way as well as the numbers over the centuries and some important Black historical figures who directly experienced the Middle Passage and Triangular Trade.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    Take a specific look at Triangular Trade with this great summary of Triangular Trade that also looks at the economics and introduces the idea of "mercantilism" in a way students will understand. Good economics lessons for middle-grade students can be very hard to find.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    Although this packet is from a 2007 museum exhibit, the information is extremely important for teaching a unit on Triangular Trade and Slavery. There is a good deal of background information and, most importantly, information on what to say/how to teach about this sensitive topic. There are also a number of suggested activities and resources.
  • The
Triangular
Trade

    Activity
    wdhs.davidson.k12.nc.us
    wdhs.davidson.k12.nc.us
    Natalie Mroz says:
    You can use this worksheet as a complete overview of Triangular Trade, and it includes a map, image, and review questions for your students.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    At this site, you will have to click on the download links under the image in order to view the lesson plan. This is a great lesson for teaching your students about the Slave Trade as well as analyzing primary source documents. It includes documents, graphic organizers, and questions to guide the students' learning.
  • eyewitnesstohistory.com
    eyewitnesstohistory.com

    African Slave Trade, 1788

    10 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    This is an eyewitness account of what occurred on the ships of the Middle Passage as written by a doctor or surgeon on board one of the ships. It is a very powerful message of the horrors that occurred; in fact, the surgeon became an abolitionist. Ask your students what impact reading a letter such as this might have had on owners of enslaved people, ship captains or the ship owners, or some other group of people of their choosing.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    A simple but effective tool to show your students quickly what was traded from whom and to where, this clickable map that details those items brought from various locations around the Atlantic.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    If you are looking for a short video that explains the Triangular Trade and the role of the British in creating more demand for enslaved people in the Americas, this is a great resource. It's an important message for our students who often don't take a look at other countries and their roles in the Slave Trade.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This series of photos shows some of the locations in Africa and America that were important to the Slave Trade. All of the images would be great for creating conversations about the various steps along the route. Students could analyze the photos for meaning, research the topic further, etc.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    PBS has developed this resource that gives the basic facts surrounding the Slave Trade and beyond. You can use this to share the information with your students in an easy-to-understand way. The presentation continues into 20th century migrations. Only Chapter 1 is specific to the Triangular Trade, but the entire presentation is worth sharing.