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History & Social Studies

Primary Sources in the History Classroom

It is important that students learn to think like historians in a History classroom. This collection of resources gives teachers a solid understanding of why primary sources should be used, how to teach students about their importance, and where to find them online.
A Collection By Nicole Bixler
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Primary Sources in the History Classroom
  • Nicole Bixler says:
    I know a lot of teachers (including me!) that really love Edcite because all of the assignments are digital and automatically scored. This Edcite assignment gives students practice analyzing and evaluating historical documents. It could be used in an ELA or History classroom.
  • Nicole Bixler says:
    This video is for teachers, rather than students, and explains five standout places to find primary sources.
  • Nicole Bixler says:
    Students love videos, and this one is a great because it clearly and easily explains to students the difference between primary and secondary sources.
  • Nicole Bixler says:
    This is a fantastic place to go when you're ready to use primary sources in the classroom. There are graphic organizers, lessons, activities, videos, and a primary sources database -- pretty much everything you need in one spot!
  • Nicole Bixler says:
    PBS's History Detectives is a wonderful program that really grabs students' attention. This page gives detailed step-by-step instructions for teaching students how to analyze primary sources and distinguish them from secondary sources. I highly recommend it!
  • Nicole Bixler says:
    Of course the Library of Congress is a great place for primary sources! This article written for teachers talks about why it's important for us to use primary sources with our students.
  • Nicole Bixler says:
    This project created by the Standford History Education Group is one of my favorite teaching resources, hands-down. It includes a nice list of primary sources for World and American History. What's even better is that it includes student-friendly versions of the primary source documents and complete lesson plans. Amazing!
  • Nicole Bixler says:
    This Edutopia blog post is great because it lists excellent places to find primary sources on the Internet and also explains each. It's a post to bookmark. There's even a section on iPad apps that are all about primary sources.