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Cross-Curricular

Open Their Ears to Active Listening

Good communication includes active listening, so helping students with this skill is imperative at a young age.  Imagine if every boy and girl both heard and listened to your spoken word in the classroom!  Practice keeping their attention with these online resources, which offer ideas like games and songs, to ensure repeating yourself less times and being more productive.  You will not sound like an ignored parent to them, but an adult who is there to teach and be a role model.
A Collection By Robyn Dezern
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Open Their Ears to Active Listening
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    Here is an activity based on role playing to stress the importance of active listening.  Students aged 8-12 paraphrase what they hear from others. The link includes a checklist for monitoring their turns as well as additional practice.  Great idea for children to be involved in what might not always be heard.
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    While definitely geared towards younger students because it is a superhero activity, it could also be used as a 2-minute fun "break" for older kids.  This video is a short story which is immediately followed by timed Q&A.  The idea is similar to listening to Tumblebooks. Higher grades could then be told to create their own character as a segue.
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    I chose this YouTube video because it is a student production discussing the "blocks" to active listening.  It shows actual student scenarios which I showed to my own 9-year-old for his feedback (My son told me how he is already a good listener!)  But most enjoyable is how this link explains terms in language kids can understand.
  • articlesforeducators.com
    articlesforeducators.com

    Listening Games And Activities

    Article
    Robyn Dezern says:
    The focus here for elementary education is sounds. The suggested listening games and activities are intended for children to practice sound discrimination, recognition, awareness, identification, and concepts. This resource also highlights using auditory, visual and kinesthetic learning in the classroom.
  • everydaylife.globalpost.com
    everydaylife.globalpost.com

    Listening Skills for Primary School

    Article
    Robyn Dezern says:
    Teachers know that active listening is a skill critical to academic success and social development.  Better understanding of our instructions without repeating them multiple times takes practice on the students' part.  So here are fun ideas to incorporate:  songs, games and stories.
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    This site explains listening skills for success in the classroom. I was not aware, for example, that there are 6 areas of listening domain, which can then be classified into 3 groups.  The link explains how skills, vocabulary and instructions impact school achievement, and it also details what students can do to improve this academic and life skill.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen

    Article
    Robyn Dezern says:
    This resource includes strategies to help students become better listeners.  It encourages students to be accountable for their level of listening. This is geared toward older students, for example if children know their mothers will repeat instructions several times they often ignore the initial request.  My favorite technique had to be the use of hand signals for "shy ones" to participate as active listeners who can show they paid attention but not be forced to vocalize what was heard.
  • fatherhood.about.com
    fatherhood.about.com

    How to Hear What Your Child Doesn't Say

    Article
    Robyn Dezern says:
    While I found this link on the fatherhood website, the theory of why adults should model "active listening" for children can apply to teachers as well as parents.  Students as young as first grade, even some kindergarteners, are capable of following 3-step directions as determined by the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association. So here are ways for our kids to practice imitating more than passing hearing of what we say and mean.