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History & Social Studies

September 11th for Elementary Age Students Born after 2001

Relevant because calendar school years open around Labor Day (before or after) in September. Our students were not alive then, but these young children may see or hear their parents react to 9-11-01. Use these resources in your classroom.
A Collection By Robyn Dezern
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
September 11th for Elementary Age Students Born after 2001
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    It is noted as child-friendly for ages 9+, only 7 minutes with realistic photos set to captivating music (students will read closed captions); excellent video to hold attention if children have never seen actual pictures or it is a vivid reminder. Possible use includes a writing lesson; students can discuss the military who support our country (US Armed Forces, Soldiers overseas, Veterans and deceased.) Then write a note of gratitude to those who serve and have served to defend America.
  • cnn.com
    cnn.com

    Teaching my child about the 9/11 attacks - CNN.com

    15 minute read
    Robyn Dezern says:
    This is an article link written by a parent that can also be used by teachers. Great resource for additional links to videos, photos, and other articles. Students should be shown pictures or movie clips which include the twin World Trade Center buildings to give perspective. Younger children can color pictures of flags, the Statue of Liberty still in NYC, etc.
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    Here are 6 Illustrated book titles to introduce young readers to September 11, 2001. The Book entitled September 12th is a personal favorite because it is subtitled "We Knew Everything Would be ALL Right." My 9-year-old son owns it because the book was authored by kids having been written and illustrated by first grade students in Missouri. It is definitely for younger students K-2 as its more about reassurance than the tragedy.
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    Scholastic collaborative site of resources to teach young children who were not born until after September 11, 2001.
  • sheknows.com
    sheknows.com

    Teaching kids about September 11, 2001

    10 minute read
    Robyn Dezern says:
    This website has a link to spark conversation for students at home. Parents can ask children what they already know from their teacher. Families can talk about significant U.S. places they have visited ie New York City, Washington DC, Pennsylvania etc. with historic landmarks at those locations (Statue of Liberty, White House, Battle of Gettsyburg, etc.)
  • theatlantic.com
    theatlantic.com

    Do American Schoolkids Need 9/11 Education?

    10 minute read
    Robyn Dezern says:
    This link is a theoretical resource with an article about why the events of 9-11 should still be explained to school children born after that day. It discusses the delicate balance of not inducing fear while addressing the topic of terrorism. It also includes how classrooms may have been affected regionally (New York coverage versus California news for example).
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    Kid friendly website includes FYI, quiz, activity page, related topics (such as terrorism) and Q&A for students to be conducted in classroom setting. It includes a history lesson plan for Grades 3-12 so Grades 3-5 can align assignment with Common Core national standards.
  • Robyn Dezern says:
    Presentation intended for kids delivered by an elementary principal. As such, the language and imagery used is intended to be understood on a child's level. Lasting 7 minutes, it includes actual footage with nice recognition of super heros that day. As a possible lesson in writing, students can write thank you letters to local emergency responders (EMT, Police officers, Fire Department, and Sheriff's office).
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