Lower Elementary
Cross-Curricular

Be Safe! Celebrating National Fire Prevention Month

Fire safety is something that everyone should know, and it's a good idea to start early! This Collection will provide teachers with the tools necessary to educate young ones in Elementary school all about the Do's and Dont's when dealing with fire. Inside you will find exciting activities, games, advice and even a video that shows children learning about fire safety. It's important to make this fun and not scary, as well as memorable! Involve parents with your activities when you can.
A Collection By Sara Kaplan
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Be Safe! Celebrating National Fire Prevention Month
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Before starting a lesson on Fire Safety with young kids, you might want to have them watch these kids learning about fire safety, so they realize it's not a scary thing to learn about, and could even be fun! These kids learn about fire safety at a local fire station. The video is not that long but briefly will give kids an idea what learning fire safety is like.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Here's a great list of Fire Tips for your kids! Print this one out and put it up on the wall. It includes a link to the "United States Fire Administration Kids Page", as well as artwork from kids depicting what they learned about fire safety (a great activity to finish up with)! Test your student's knowledge on fire safety today!
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Learn about fire safety from someone who knows! This Mom has some wonderful ideas for making fire safety both memorable and fun. Includes pictures and a fun creative game to help remember numbers in case of an emergency. Enjoy!
  • Fire Safe Kids

    Website
    firesafekids.org
    firesafekids.org
    Sara Kaplan says:
    Young kids will be more likely to remember important facts through play, and these games are perfect for learning fire safety! Introduce these games as a class or have kids pick and choose which ones to play individually (or in groups). There are three to choose from: "Word Scramble", "On Call" (you lead a fire engine to its destination) and "Save the Town" (put out the fire and be the hero of the day!).
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Smokey the Bear has always been an important icon for teaching fire safety, and who could blame kids all over for adoring this big friendly wise bear of the woodlands? Journey with Smokey as you identify items that might cause wildfires (a great group activity), create a story as a class, in groups or individually, or even color fire-safety related pictures that you can print out from the site. This site is geared towards the wild, but it can be a great way to expand on the topic.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Keep your kids focused on fire safety by helping them make fun book covers while learning fire safety tips! This lesson is inspired by "Clifford the Firehouse Dog", which is read to the class at the beginning of the lesson. Students then learn about fire safety before making book covers that look like Clifford. I would suggest taking this a step further and use the cover for a book about fire safety, where students keep all the tip in one place!
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    On this page you'll find some great suggestions for in-classroom and at-home activities to use for teaching fire safety. These activities are both simple to enact and rewarding and will get kids excited about learning about fire safety. For instance, one in-classroom activity suggests having a local firefighter teach your students in the classroom, and for home, creating songs for remembering important phone numbers in case of emergencies. Enjoy!
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Have your students create a fun easy-to-locate and creative "Fire Safety Booklet"! Students can print out and color each card that contains a picture relating a tip on fire safety. They should have the option to color the picture in or not. You can punch a hole in each card and use a metal ring clasp to make an easy-to-flip booklet. Having one copy at home and one at school might prove useful and help connect students with their parents.
  • 10 Rules of Fire Safety

    Website
    firesafetyforkids.org
    firesafetyforkids.org
    Sara Kaplan says:
    "Rescue: Fire Safety For Kids" is a fantastic site with many things available on fire safety. A great place to start would be with this list of fire safety tips. Use a color printer to print out and hang on the wall, so that your kids can review fire safety tips every day! (Or, subsequently, you can print one out for each student to have at their desk or bring home with them as a reminder.) I highly suggest exploring the rest of the site as it provides great activities.