Middle School
Cross-Curricular

Life Is Worth Living: Preventing Suicide in Your School

Adolescents everywhere are at risk for suicide, and the United States is of no exception. This Collection will help teachers to educate their students about suicide, and how to prevent it.
A Collection By Sara Kaplan
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Life Is Worth Living: Preventing Suicide in Your School
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    A great place to begin is this page all about Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. Have an informative discussion with your class about the "Warning Signs and Risks of Suicide", and encourage your students to "Take the Stigmafree Pledge" to prevent suicide in school as well as their own communities.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    In this video, real kids discuss depression, suicide and what you can do to make a difference in the lives of others---perhaps those close to you who you didn't even know where affected by these feelings. Hearing other kids talk about these real-life issues will make it real for your students, and hopefully encourage them to take action if ever a situation presented themselves in their lives. I recommend having a group discussion afterwards about key points made in the video.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Refer to this article for inspirational ideas on establishing "School Based Suicide Prevention Programs" and share these ideas with your school! Getting everyone involved is a surefire way to prevent potential tragedy. Also includes important facts and other preventative measures.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Pass out this important article on teen suicide for teachers and staff, as well as inform your students on the signs of both mania and depression---both which could lead to suicidal thoughts.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Students are encouraged to role play and think creatively in this Unit Lesson that involves several different activities that might involve both group or individual performances. The video shows four people from the faculty discussing the Unit, and providing examples of the activities. I highly recommend the "Phone Booth" activity which can split students up in pairs, and have one student help another student who is acting as someone who is suicidal.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Share this article with your students: it could potentially save a life! The article includes informative sections like "Common misconceptions about suicide", discusses in depth the "Warning Signs of Suicide", and provides the Do's and Don'ts of "When talking with a suicidal person", as well as helpful tips and more!
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Suicide Prevention Can Start in School

    Article
    Sara Kaplan says:
    In the wake of yet another teenager's tragic suicide, Palo Alto issued this article that encourages schools to use screening programs as one among many possible preventative measures to spreading awareness about suicide and keeping an eye out for the danger signs. The article also shares some other helpful ideas as to how to stay involved and aware. This article is a sobering eye-opener to how serious this problem has become and how everyone can get involved to make a difference.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    The activities in this handout are specified for "Grades 9-12", but I would recommend this for middle school as well, where depression is just as much a possibility as high school. Students will have the opportunity to learn the "Red Flags" of suicide, create a "Safe Haven" sheet that shows "Who's at risk" and "Where to get help" (etc.) and more!
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    A teacher shares about his teaching experience using the American Society for Suicide Prevention's eye-opening video called "More Than Sad", which also includes a "fact sheet" about suicide, and other important suggestions when showing such a sobering film to your class.