Middle School
Cross-Curricular

What do YOU think?: Taking On Peer Pressure in Middle School

Middle school is often a time of intense pressure for students, and not just academically- but socially as well. Help your students learn how to face situations that involve peer pressure. These techniques will inspire your students and assist them in problem-solving and expressing their own fears about peer pressure in a judgement-free environment.
A Collection By Sara Kaplan
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
What do YOU think?: Taking On Peer Pressure in Middle School
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    To get an idea about what teens go through, watch this short video as real teens talk about their experiences with peer pressure. Showing this in front of a middle school class might help them not feel alone, and spark a conversation.
  • Peer Pressure

    Website
    teensforlife.com
    teensforlife.com
    Sara Kaplan says:
    Provide your students with this helpful article that offers sound advice with how to deal with peer pressure, and perhaps inspire students to come up with their own ideas on how to handle peer pressure. Encourage your students to talk about their experiences and think critically about how these suggestions will help them in their everyday lives.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    In this video an older student offers practical advice on ways to face peer pressure with regards to "Drink and Smoke". This advice could very well save a young person's life! Share this with your students, and encourage them to tell their friends. Follow up with a Q&A as well as a whole class discussion on peer pressure.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Interactive sites are great tools in this day and age to connect students with important topics like peer pressure. On this site, teens will find sage advice, how to spot peer pressure, and play easy point-and-click styles games that will help prepare them for situations where they might be confronted with peer pressure.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    As seen on the same Interactive site above, the comprehensive “Bag of Tricks” Lesson includes extended pages such as a helpful “Student Response Sheet”, as well as several “Role Play Scenarios”. There is also a “Direct Instruction” and “Discussion Questions” section, a “Closing and Summary” session, and a “Suggested follow-up activities to Peer Pressure Lessons”. There’s even some extra notes and glossary cards you can print, cut out and dispense for your students.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Inspire students to think critically with these two thought-provoking activities that use real-world problems that teenagers might face on an everyday basis. Both activities provide hypothetical situations involving peer pressure and are designed to help students work on gaining self confidence and improving their own problem-solving skills. You can follow both activities with the Quiz at the end of the packet, which also comes with a handy Answer Key.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Help your students problem solve peer pressure issues with these great worksheet activities, designed for both group activities and individual use!
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Invite students to ask themselves personally "Have I been peer pressured?" so as to stop it from happening in the future. Follow up with an lesson and/or class discussion about peer pressure.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What are the best ways to handle peer pressure, and how can we teach these strategies effectively to today's middle school students?