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History & Social Studies

Marching to Vote: Selma 50 Years Ago

This collection includes artifacts to enlighten our students on past events that are still shaping our future.
A Collection By Shelina Warren
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Marching to Vote: Selma 50 Years Ago
  • teachingforchange.org
    teachingforchange.org

    The Selma Voting Rights Struggle: 15 Key Points from Bottom-Up History and Why It Matters Today

    Article
    Shelina Warren says:
    This article, from the Teaching For Change: Building Social Justice Starting in the Classroom is going to answer the why questions the students have. Why do we need to learn about Selma? What was the Voting Rights Act? What is this important? What does this past event/issue have to do with the present? Students will gain knowledge to understand why this collection is just as important as the others.
  • Shelina Warren says:
    This video shows the signing of the Voting Rights Act. As our students have a hard time fathoming how life was then, this video should help give them more of an idea. I felt this video was important to add to the collection to see actual footage from that time period. Students need to see and understand how life was then so they can compare it to today.
  • Shelina Warren says:
    This is a lesson plan that will help our students further understand the impact, challenges, and relevance of the Voting Rights Act from 1965 to current times.
  • Shelina Warren says:
    Students will analyze the iconic photograph taken by James Karales (Selma-to-Montgomery March for Voting Rights in 1965) to further understand the March to Vote. They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Let's let our students be the judge of that!
  • Shelina Warren says:
    Why did thousands march over 50 miles through cold, Alabama rain in 1965? After participating in this lesson, students will be able to answer that question as they learn about the Selma-to-Montgomery voting rights march. After analyzing photojournalist James Karales's iconic photograph of the march, reading background material on it, and considering what the marchers might have thought and felt, students write and illustrate a postcard describing this civil rights event from a marcher's view.
  • Shelina Warren says:
    This book depicts the repeated efforts of civil rights advocates to march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, only to be interrupted by national guardsmen. This book does a great job for helping introduce students to the voting rights issue and why it was so important in Selma.
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BloomBoard Asks:How have you applied ideas from this collection to your classroom?