Middle School
English Language Arts

Teaching Inferential Reading

Inferential reading is a required skill across the curriculum with its mastery playing an essential role in students engaging in higher order thinking. The good news is that students who struggle with this skill can be taught it explicitly. This collection of resources provides teachers with a solid understanding of inferential reading and a variety of practical strategies to boost their students' comprehension level.
A Collection By Shelley Okposin
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Teaching Inferential Reading
  • psycnet.apa.org
    psycnet.apa.org

    Testing and Refining the Direct and Inferential Mediation Model of Reading Comprehension.

    5 minute read
    Shelley Okposin says:
    This article discusses a new model of reading comprehension, the Direct and Inferential Mediation (DIME) model, which was created after extensive review of literature on high school student's comprehension challenges. The model explores the relationships between background knowledge, inferences, reading comprehension strategies, vocabulary, and word reading and is sure to give teachers insight into the role of inferential reading in students' comprehension.
  • Shelley Okposin says:
    This colorful and engaging wall chart is a must for teachers seeking to improve their students' inferential reading skills. It provides an excellent visual representation of the sequential steps students need to go through which examine the context in order to help students establish the inferred meaning of words.
  • Shelley Okposin says:
    This blog post explores why the teaching of inferential reading is so important in moving students beyond the simple comprehension of a text to become readers that recognize inferences. It postulates that understanding inferences is a fundamental skill students must master before they can effectively study literature. The post also gives teachers a few activities and resources that may assist middle school classes in developing their inference skills.
  • Shelley Okposin says:
    In her book, Kylene Beers explores the seemingly ellusive skill of inferential reading. She outlines 15 types of inferences that good readers are able to make and offers practical strategies teachers can use to explicitly teach them. She gives teachers comments and questions that can be used to guide students' thinking. In addition, she tackles the issue of effectively differentiating inferential reading.
  • Shelley Okposin says:
    This literature review explores the notion of different types of inferences occurring in texts; coherence, elaborative, local, global, on-line and off-line inferences. The review provides an in-depth discussion stemming from the literature of various teaching strategies and their effectiveness in increasing students' comprehension of inferences. The researcher also explores what progression of inference skills may look like and how can it be better supported in a learning environment.