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Are You a "Pushover" Teacher?

Do you know whether you're a "pushover" teacher? Boundaries and respect are of the utmost importance, but sometimes, students become too friendly and take too many liberties. Re-empower yourself as the leader with this collection. You'll find that you can be respected and well-liked, even when you do draw that line.
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 10 Collection Items
  • 10 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Are You a "Pushover" Teacher?
  • Sian Babish says:
    Cosmo U.K. gives 15 real-life scenarios (and dialogues) that indicate you're a pushover. If you find yourself in these uncomfortable conversations often, it might be time to conduct a personal inventory. It's a humorous approach to a big issue in your teaching career, but in all reality, it's important to examine why you're a pushover. The quotes are so ridiculous that you have no choice but to begin rethinking the way you present yourself to your students.
  • Sian Babish says:
    In this thread at Fluther.com, a young teacher shares his story of being a nice person who ended up being taken advantage of by students. He is pretty candid about his mistakes, making it a good read for any new, young teachers. The commenters share their tips, and encourage young teachers in similar situations to remain assertive and most importantly, authoritative. It's definitely an experience every teacher can relate to at some point!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Lance Bledsoe shares this blog post on the turning point of his teaching career: he decided to become a meaner teachers. As a self-described laid-back teacher, he stopped in on a colleague's class one day, only to notice a a completely different tone and class dynamic. Bledsoe explains how this observation made him realize that setting the tone at the beginning of class makes a difference. It's a great, consistent way for "too nice" teachers to dial back their classroom.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Sherrie Campbell writes this article for Entrepreneur, in which she provides seven behaviors that will help move you away from being a pushover. The article puts the opposite of a pushover, an assertive individual, in an attainable framework. Campbell also points out that becoming assertive is a journey, not a destination. It's a must-read for teachers who are in need of establishing ground rules at the beginning of the school year.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Blogger Sharon Harrigan shares the story of her daughter, Ella, who once told her pediatrician that teachers were too nice. Read how Ella responds to questions about the teacher, and determine whether you are guilty of the same things. Of course all things are well-intended in the classroom, but when a skeptic fifth-grade girl picks up on a pushover teacher, that means the entire fifth grade already knows it.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Ann Gravells of FE News U.K. says that establishing ground rules is important, but it's even more important to know the different types of rules. She gives examples of negotiable versus non-negotiable rules, as well as more constructive, positive phrasing of said rules. Gravells also shows the different ways to implement and maintain rules by use of visual aids or contracts. It's a great article for teachers conflicted on boundary-setting.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Larry Ferlazzo and Rick Wormeli of Middle Web asks this important question to fellow teachers. Ferlazzo speaks from the perspective of a former community organizer, explaining how private and person sometimes mix, and sometimes become problematic. Wormeli offers ways to navigate being friends versus being friendly, all by means of boundaries. It's a dynamic read from two really great veterans of teaching.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Vine contributor, David Brayton, does his best impression of a pushover teacher. He even hashtags his short skit: #relatable #comedy #typesofteachers. Of course this is a perfect example of observational humor, but the real question is this: could this be you? If you find yourself at the mercy of your students' incessant talking, you need to find a way to take back your classroom. Don't be THAT teacher!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Jill Hare, editor of Teaching Community, details 10 things a teacher should never do. The damage it does is quite obvious here: these behaviors make students stop respecting you, therefore you are susceptible to becoming a pushover. Use Hare's article as a cautionary tale, before you go down that rabbit hole!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Teaching Channel poses a community question on whether a teacher can build rapport with students that balances friendliness with professional distance. Teachers hopped on this question, and the guidance is golden here. Many comments stem from personal experience, and the general consensus is to avoid being too personal on your behalf even when students over-share. You'll find that many responses share much of the same advice.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:How can teachers tell if they're being too nice, and walked all over by their students?