Lower Elementary
English Language Arts

How to Explain Prepositions Better

Prepositions: where would we be without them? This part of speech helps establish relationships between words, so it’s important for young learners to grasp these concepts quickly. Use this collection to explore different lesson plans and activities that make prepositions fun, accessible, and unforgettable. Did you ever have to memorize them? I did!
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 10 Collection Items
  • 10 Collection Items
  • Discussion
How to Explain Prepositions Better
  • Sian Babish says:
    Sysan Verner, contributor to Busy Teacher, details five easy games to get your class on top of their preposition game. In these games, students are encouraged to draw, walk around, and interact with one another in ways that contextualize prepositions and their relationships with words. Verner also mentions how helpful these games are to ESL students. My favorite is #5, the Prepositional Maze- just make sure the floor is tidy before you start!
  • Sian Babish says:
    The Bazillions, a kid-friendly educational rock band, wrote a song about preopositions. The YouTube "music video" for the song is a colorful cartoon that stressed certain words as they are sung in the song. Students can learn the song quite easily, especially with the lyrics included in the information section. It's a really catchy song that helps explain the concept of preopositions in less than four minutes.
  • Sian Babish says:
    K12 Reader features this free printable PDF handout. Students are given a series of words and are asked to "kick-out" the word that is not a preposition. This is a great handout, especially since it recaps the questions answered by prepositions before giving the instructions. The soccer theme of the handout is inviting to grade school students, many of whom start playing pee-wee soccer at this age. There's also an answer key, but I doubt you need that!
  • Sian Babish says:
    YouTube Channel WaysAndHow uses this video to explain some of the difficulties students have when learning prepositions. The seven-point presentation takes you from beginning the first lesson to the final test of using them in sentences. The video gives you the best ways to keep your lesson simple and relatable, so that both native speakers and ESL students can begin to understand this somewhat difficult, abstract part of speech.
  • Preposition Exercises

    Website
    perfect-english-grammar.com
    perfect-english-grammar.com
    Sian Babish says:
    Perfect English Grammar has a handful of preposition exercises on this page. Students can fill-in the blanks and check their answers to check their progress in real time. To help students learn to group and select prepositions, the exercises divide into four sections: time, place, after verbs, and after adjectives. You can gamify this activity too, by putting the class into teams and hosting a mini-game show!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Best Children's Books shares ten books which are fantastic literary resources to teach prepositions. Below a picture of each book cover is the suggested age range, which is helpful for teaching different levels of understanding. Some of the selections are very simple like Joey and Jet, while others are targeted at the more mature, third grade learner like Under, Over, By the Clover. Seeing the prepositions in the motion of a story can also help students better connect with them.
  • Sian Babish says:
    YouTube Channel TurtleDiary shares this free prepositions lesson for your third grade class. The presentation features a mini-chalkboard and text that is highlighted as it's spoken. It's easy for students to follow along on a handout, or for beginner note-takers to write down the main ideas of the presentation. There are also images to accompany the examples, so there are visible spatial relationships between the prepositions and other words. It's really engaging!
  • Sian Babish says:
    This interactive preposition game is modeled after Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. Students can play alone or with a partner to try their luck to answer the questions. The answers are arranged in a multiple-choice format, from which the students must select the correct sentence for the image. It's a very simple, quick game, but it's good practice for both reading and remembering prepositions. It's also a great tool to stress the importance of reading directions!
  • Sian Babish says:
    File Folder Heaven sells a collection of books with different themes where prepositions lessons are adapted. The books come in a variety of animals, such as Where is Monkey Hiding?, or Where is Penguin Hiding?, so young learners can connect with their favorite animals. The books also reinforce color and color words. For only $3.00 a book, you can add a couple to your classroom library, and perhaps your personal one too!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Teach This shares this free printable PDF preposition dominoes game. It includes the dominoes, which students can cut out, and the easy-to-follow directions. It was originally designed as an ESL game, but it is adaptable to native speaking students in second or third grades. You can even design your own dominoes in word, and completely customize the game, or personalize it to your class!
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BloomBoard Asks:What are the best ways to illustrate how prepositions work?