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Incorporate Jigsaw Strategy in Your Classroom

Using the Jigsaw Strategy can really pay off for your students. Not only do they get the change to become "experts," they also hone their skills in group work. If you are looking into developing your classroom as a collaborative learning space, check out these these guides:
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Incorporate Jigsaw Strategy in Your Classroom
  • Sian Babish says:
    East Carolina University assembled this instructional PowerPoint on "Think-Pair-Share," which is slightly different than Jigsaw. The diagram on Slide 19 explains how both approaches are alike, different, and overlap. The videoclips are very helpful, as they breakdown how to apply the strategy in different classes.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Lucia Morales welcomes us into her classroom to demonstrate how her 8th grade students work with Jigsaw. Since we get to see the project from start to finish, you can easily breakdown the chronology and flow the projects if you're new to Jigsaw. This is a great presentation because you also see how Mrs. Morales gets a chance to interact with each group separately.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Pamela Martin gives subject-specific examples of how to adapt a lesson to Jigsaw. It's a really great way to see the different ways you can break down and compartmentalize information so students can form their groups. Martin also includes some other Jigsaw articles from fellow teachers.
  • Sian Babish says:
    There can be some problem areas when it comes to Jigsaw, namely with different types of students. Learn how to distinguish between the four main types, and how to get them to work best in groups. Because Jigsaw is also a lesson in socializing, this is a great tool to maintain a balanced group environment.
  • Sian Babish says:
    If you are designing your first Jigsaw activity, this is a great step-by-step checklist to make sure you get everything covered. The section on differentiated instruction is very valuable, as it addresses meeting the needs of all students, including partnering ELL students with competent readers. The reflection section is a great closing note so you can assess whether you are satisfied with the lesson, and take a retrospective look at it one last time.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Beginning on slide 17, you can learn how to implement Jigsaw in a math class. The example of teaching mean, median, and mode is used to illustrate how to break students into groups. I like the recommendation of a mini-quiz at the end of the activity, so students know the group work is meant to be taken seriously.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Jennifer Gonzalez, Editor-in-Chief of Cult of Pedagogy, delivers a 4-point informative brief on Jigsaw Strategy. She explains the history, the correct method of implementation, and variations of it. The video explains the steps and has a downloadable document to correspond.
  • Classroom Architect

    Website
    classroom.4teachers.org
    classroom.4teachers.org
    Sian Babish says:
    If your interior designer is speaking to you, you can finally listen to it. Use this floor plan tool to change the layout of your classroom so it can best accommodate a Jigsaw-friendly lesson. Thankfully it has the tables in different shapes, so you can get really specific in your new layout!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Dr. Meire explains how home groups and experts work in a project. She takes us into an elementary classroom where students demonstrate their grasp of how the activity is modeled. The video does a great job explaining where TA's fit into these activities, too.
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